General Sport Kite

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  3. A Classic

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  4. Welcome 45 New People

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  5. STACKED STUNT KITES

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  6. Walk of Shame

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  7. Kite Flying Music

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  8. Kite Videos

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  9. Hawaiian Team Kite

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  10. New From Lam

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  11. LS Accessories

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  12. Skybond Now

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  13. Prism Jazz stunt kite

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    • "Paul" meaning the designer of the Hydra, Paul de Bakker I suppose? Do you know what the Hydra makes me curious about - the Jinx. Imagine something Hydra like but a bit larger giving you more time to learn the inputs (I assume). This kite is unfortunately no longer available... (I just had to do this to fuel your kite collection desire ). A word of comfort instead, you have gotten hold of a keen pitch-happy kite that wants to do much "tumbling around" with a small input. Last spring I had a project that for a series of sessions just vary input to see what come out of it, which suited the ITW Hydra well. It doesn't have the wide wind window of the Kymera though, but very few trick oriented DLKs do. I also use the Kymera for somewhat lower winds than the Hydra. One feature of the Hydra as I see it is that when doing a cascade the number of required inputs is less than for other kites I've tried - the short pull on the current lower wing (just before the major pop for a half axel) is not necessary to avoid that the kite gradually (with each cycle) ends up on its back (however not in light winds when the whole cascading thing would fail for me anyhow). Another thing is that one need to be gentle/active for the turtles to last - earlier than intended exit is not unusual for me here. According to this Kite Clique 2009 *Focus Kites* Hydra (any differences in any details for the Focus/ITW versions?) review it got a wide wind range as well: http://v2.2.kiteclique.com/focus-kite-designs-hydra-review-by-jared-haworth/ In the review they mention that the "winglet" (isn't a "winglet" the outermost vertical part of the wing of e.g. an airliner to reduce fuel consumption - well what do I, a non native English speaker, know?) mini battens got lose. This has happened to both the left and right side. I just repaired it with patches of ripstop (spinnaker?) tape: Should one have gotten hold of a very thick thread (like the one that already holds them) and (scary thought) manually added a couple of stitches to secure the mini battens further or at least have applied the ripstop tape from the beginning? After the session when you return the Hydra into the bag I recommend that you check that they are OK. (And I know that I have posted this Hydra link before, but this is what I aim for one day.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yvUJ9bxB0Gc  ) Talking of the Kymeras, when I did the the dual DLK thing, I lost (100% my fault) the rearmost weights (just under the velcro that forms a "T" with the spine) on both my Kymeras when attaching tails to them. Now when needed, I borrow the tail weight from the Maestro 3, but what mass (or just as well dimensions if assuming steel) should the weight for a Kymera really have? Understandable - available time goes up and down in life. I suppose taking care of a small individual (child) and kite development/making/repair take up a considerable amount of time. When we got children, and due to other family circumstances, I flew about five times in about 15 years... I have just gotten started in kite sewing (putting much of my recent kiting time there) by making a mini-kite not to consume much material when learning, and guess what: I've only been out kiting three times this year.   
    • I've only flown an indoor, once. But Joe recently said that an experienced pilot could easily overcome whatever variances the lack of mesh causes. 
    • One of the best justifications is a variety of kites will develop a nicely  rounded flying style. At the start I tried to be very mechanical learning the lines.  I do this and the kite does that sorta thing. Probably kept me from breaking things more often than I have.  Now that I'm learning to be more fluid with the wind  [ getting a little dance on ] the mechanics are coming easier. Someone said that the variety actually enhances your learning. Have to agree. Bouncing from kite to kite gives me little epiphanies that are starting to snowball.Only 9,928 more hours of practice to go. YAY