makatakam

Kitelife Subscriber
  • Content count

    1,955
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    104

makatakam last won the day on September 25

makatakam had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

1,566 Scholar

1 Follower

About makatakam

  • Rank
    Kite Romantic
  • Birthday 04/10/1951

Profile Information

  • Favorite Kite(s)
    revs, other quads
  • Flying Since
    2009
  • Location
    Schaumburg (Chicago), Illinois
  • Country
    United States
  • Interests
    fishing, fossils, kites
  • Gender
    Male

Recent Profile Visitors

8,931 profile views
  1. New Flyer, Second Kite

    Cool. Remember, though, that you'll have to fly it upside down in the northern hemisphere.
  2. Revolution Gear Pack (9/23/17)

    Congratulations.
  3. Welcome cjkramos

    Hey, cj. Welcome to the forum. I look forward to crossing lines with you some day.
  4. Bridle Jig

    Good informative post. I believe a lot of people thought that a tying jig is a complicated, high-tech setup, not realizing that it can be as simple as a pine board with a few pins placed at the distances between knots plus the length of the knot if so desired.
  5. Axle help

    Reviewing this thread made me think, so I took some Excedrin for the pain. Seriously though, when doing a catch and throw, it may be possible to make the throw an axel in itself. Has anyone here tried it? And with one spin in the right direction put into the lines before the throw, the axel would also unwind the lines.
  6. Flying with no sleeving

    It looks just like the sleeved lines, only imagine two figure-eight knots instead of two overhand at the base of the loop, and a loop that's two inches longer, and no sleeving. You can tie one more figure-eight knot in the distal end of the loop so there is something you can grab easily to undo the larkshead when breaking down the kite.
  7. Axle help

    Yup, easier to get that sharp pop past your hip on shorter lines. Throw lots of slack with the other, more than you would with longer lines. Easier to see the way it reacts on shorter lines too. Midvent in 6-9mph is axel heaven. Any more than 9, work it closer to the edges of the window. Practice both directions so you don't become "handed".
  8. KARMA 9/21/2017: Revolution Rainbow Radical

    Winner is elmo264. The random.org page is a photo, not a link.
  9. KARMA 9/21/2017: Revolution Rainbow Radical

    Drum roll, please. The winner is: Congratulations, @elmo264.
  10. KARMA 9/21/2017: Revolution Rainbow Radical

    Ok, it's 8:00 pm. This is the cut-off post. No more entries after this post. I'll be back in a few minutes to post the winner. Good luck!
  11. Newbie Bay Area friends and Rev learning tips

    When you feel like you have almost no control over the kite, you should have switched about 5mph ago. When it hits 15mph I'm already on my full vent. I don't like a lot of pull and find greater satisfaction in precision and control. If you like the pull and the speed, make your next kite a Rev Supersonic. You'll literally hoot flying that puppy! Give it a try next time you see someone flying one. Just remember, things are gonna happen really fast. It flies backward nearly as fast as your midvent flies forward.
  12. KARMA 9/21/2017: Revolution Rainbow Radical

    I will draw the winner at about 8pm Central time tomorrow, 9-21-17, using random.org to generate the winning number. That gives you less than 24 hours to get in on this drawing. Good luck to all.
  13. Newbie Bay Area friends and Rev learning tips

    The upper limit of the manufacturer's specified wind range, or a few mph less than that if you take gusts into consideration, is a good point to move to the next venting level. Although most kites can be flown well above that recommended upper limit, it will prematurely stretch the sail material. Now, I say "prematurely" because the material will eventually stretch anyway. Pressure of the wind in the sail will make it happen and there is no way to stop it. You gotta face the fact that it will happen, because kites-- like cars -- ultimately just wear out from being used. So knowing that, there is only one question left to ask: Are you gonna fly, or you gonna watch? If you can afford to replace the kite sooner than expected, go for it and fly. If your budget is limited, switch kites or fly someone else's, or pack it up and watch. It's up to you and please know that the kite will still fly fairly well even if the sail is stretched. It just won't be at peak performance depending on your style of flying. If you're into precision, I think it actually performs better. A new crisp sail is better for a yank and spank style and tricking.
  14. New Flyer, Second Kite

    Hi, Arctic Cat ZRT, and welcome to the forum. It is easier to fly in low wind conditions if you have tons of experience (hundreds of hours), but don't let that disillusion you. It only gets easier with each time you fly in those conditions. Although I can fly a dual, I'm more of a quad-head and not much into tricking the duals, even though I own a few higher-end ones. I'm going to let the more experienced pilots here guide you in the selection of a kite for the conditions you described, which are pretty much the same winds that all of us inland flyers have to deal with. I have only chimed in on your query to make you aware that there is a chance that you will not "click" immediately with any kite you select, as some flyers are not comfortable flying a kite that another flyer may absolutely love. Once you start selecting kites for a specific purpose, it becomes very much a matter of personal preference. It is good sense to "try before you buy", if you can. If not, then trial and error is your only option, but don't let that scare you, as it is unlikely that you will absolutely hate the kite you choose. Good luck in your venture. I look forward to sharing a field with you some day. Have fun, smile and don't forget to breathe.
  15. Maxi vented rev

    It's not one of mine. I just grabbed the image as an example, but I have flown similar kites. Flies like a vented Rev, maybe just a touch smoother with a lighter feel until you get to really, really strong wind. Kind of like being slightly "disconnected" from the kite. Like flying a ghost kite. Hard to explain, but I think you get the idea.