John Barresi

Jump

12 posts in this topic

The Jump comes from a computerized 3D/CAD, optimized design. The Jump has a silicone coated sail. You can fly in and out of the water with absolutely no water absorption.

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Sail - 0.75 oz. Silicone Coated Nylon

Frame - .1800 Pultruded Carbon

Wing span - 63 in.

Height - 28 in.

Weight - 6 oz.

Wind range - 3-18 mph.

Bridle - Spectra core-3 Point

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I have also flown this kite, and I have to say, it is the only smaller wingspan kite that I've flown that is able to pull off some of the most advanced freestyle tricks.

This thing blew me away, truly. I just sat there with my mouth hanging open as I saw it performing half axles, jacobs ladders, and razor sharp 90degree turns.

Highly recommended. :wacko:

~Jon

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Found another fun Jump video, posted on GWTW...

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Hah! Yes, I"ve seen this video before. ;) Makes me smile.

Also makes me wish my Cherry Bomb was a Jump. o.0

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"Silicone Coated Nylon"...that sounds pretty slick!!

Has anyone tried "Pam" on their kite or, especially, their lines?

Keep It Up!

Duane

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Pam is vegetable oil, but Camp Dry might work.

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Pam is vegetable oil, but Camp Dry might work.

If it's a coating for the nylon/poly on the sails, you should invest in McLube. I've not tried it, but our British mates who are/were involved with sailing swear by it.

If it's a lubricant for your lines, check out sewers aid. You can find it at JoAnn Fabrics, although the clerks will not know what you're talking about. Look in the area by the needles ... look again only more closely this time ... it's there. I've used it on Shanti lines and it really does help make them slippery again ... my Shanti lines are a little frayed.

Cheers,

Tom

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Hi Tom,

You're right...I had to look twice to find the stuff. It's sort of cool that someone on the other side of the country can talk about the same store, JoAnn Fabrics, when we have one few miles away.

Anyway...I got a bottle of that "Sewer's Aid" and started thinking about the best way to get the stuff from the bottle to the line without waisting any (it's not the cheapest lube I've ever met). But, one thing I've learned since I got into kiting is I shouldn't try to reinvent the wheel when there is all the experience and know-how right here if I ask.

Yeah...OK this IS a stupid question, but how did you put in on the line? :sign_kitelife:

Keep It Up!

Duane

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... I got a bottle of that "Sewer's Aid" ... how did you put in on the line?

I stretched the lines out in the back yard and tied one end of each line to a stake. Then I used a small (1" x 1") square of flannel cloth (gun cleaning swab) saturated with the sewers aid to rub up and down each line. I made sure the cloth was always wet with the sewers aid. Next time I'll save the cloth in a film canister instead of throwing it away.

I'm sure there's a better way, but that was the best I could come up with at the time.

Cheers,

Tom

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Thanks Tom,

Glad I asked!! That sounds like a real good way to do it. (And I'm not going to mention the ways I was coming up with...heehee!) :sign_kitelife:

Keep It Up!

Duane

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My wife just got back from shopping (again) and handed me a bottle of "Fray Check" *Prevents fabric from fraying & secures thread ends* She got to at JoAnn's also.

I should have had this to try out on that frayed line I cut down. I'll have to give it a try next time I run into that problem again. I figure it would probably be best to use the "Fray Check" prior to the "Lube" or clean the "Lube" off where the fray ocures...use the "Fray-Check"...and then re-lube it.

I'll post what the results are, if I ever have to use the stuff.

Keep It Up!

Duane

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My wife just got back from shopping (again) and handed me a bottle of "Fray Check" *Prevents fabric from fraying & secures thread ends* She got to at JoAnn's also.

I should have had this to try out on that frayed line I cut down. I'll have to give it a try next time I run into that problem again. I figure it would probably be best to use the "Fray Check" prior to the "Lube" or clean the "Lube" off where the fray ocures...use the "Fray-Check"...and then re-lube it.

I'll post what the results are, if I ever have to use the stuff.

Keep It Up!

Duane

Try a small sample first!!! I used some on several of my Revs to stop the leading edge fraying ... leaves a whitish line that I don't like. Since it's kind of an adhesive, it might make your lines a little stiff ...

Play around with it and see what happens ... can't hurt that dual line stuff anyway ... right???

Cheers,

Tom

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