tbressure

Mid vented wind range

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I've purchased a mid vented b-serie few month ago. I wanted to used it from 15 mph to 20 mph wind because I used to fly with the b-serie full sail until 15 mph. Since I fly with the mid-vented I'm happy to see that it can be flown since 12 mph and even less.

 

What is the wind range of the mid-vented ? Depending on the pilot skill but what is your opinion ?

 

 

Thierry Bressure

 

 

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In my limited experiences I found it depending on two variables. Consistency of the wind, kite design. I have JB, Bazzer Eyes and Shook midvents, down to 6-7 mph with consistent beach winds and each still performs well. Change to variable inland winds and 10ish or more. Tuning near neutral versus forward is also important. They are much more flexible and can be used in lower winds than we think.

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I fly inland in variable conditions.  It is a rare day that the wind is consistent for an entire session.  I typically fly three hours or so.  I usually fly four or five different kites during that time span,  dualies, quads & maybe even put up a SLK if the wind is somewhat steady.  The wind that inspires me to go to the field is usually pretty good.  Many times I will begin with a standard sail, maybe even a Rev 1.  But if the wind picks up or is gusty I will switch to my favorite 1.5 Rev the mid-vent B.  I have noticed many times that I will end the session flying the mid-vent as the evening calm sets in.  As the wind slows I believe I may be flying down to as low as five mph.  But at ground level the wind is lower so I try to stay above ten feet where the wind is a little better.  So the wind may actually be higher than my perceived five mph.  I can see one flag nearby & it needs to be more than gently flapping.  When the mid won't fly any longer I am usually ready to pack up & head for home.

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For my flying abilities 5 or 6 is about as low as I'll go with the mid vent. I ordered a vented B series and am excited to see how low of wind it will fly in as well.


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I would recommend 7 to 18 mph for a beginner. Advanced flyers from 2 to 30 mph, with lots of work, 4 to 22 mph with ease.

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I make a try with a lower measured wind than yesterday. What a damn I love my semi-vented



Thierry Bressure

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I'm new too and also have been learning on my mid-vent, I actually now think that the line length is a significant factor to consider when flying in given wind conditions. Shorter (30-50ft) for lower wind speeds, longer (80-120ft) for higher wind speeds.

But then again maybe I just fly with newbie bad habits to come to conclude that. Ha.

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 I think you will find weight to be in the equation too. Lighter lines (50#) even in longer lengths come out to still be lighter. Sometimes the winds come in as layers, short lines may never reach them, long will! Sometimes short works fine - just gotta try stuff!

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21 hours ago, happysuperbutton said:

I actually now think that the line length is a significant factor to consider when flying in given wind conditions. Shorter (30-50ft) for lower wind speeds, longer (80-120ft) for higher wind speeds.

It is. The kite has to lift everything except the handles. If you really get into flying in very low speed wind, you will find yourself making modifications to the bridle, frame, bungees, endcaps, line sleeving, and anywhere else you can to reduce overall weight. Just don't make the changes permanent until you are satisfied with the result. Make changes one at a time so you have a good idea of what makes a bigger difference. You can shave up to 3 ounces off of the total weight if you get creative.

Just remember, a lighter kite is also more fragile. You can't beat on it as much without breaking something.

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16 hours ago, Wayne Dowler said:

Sometimes the winds come in as layers, short lines may never reach them, long will!

Finally I hear this from someone else that also seems to have done this observation! Have long lines to reach over the low winds close to the ground is another take on it. So far the standard recommendation I found is just to go to shorter lines.

Talking about wind ranges, I've flown my full vent as a standard, mid vent and full vent, by adding patches. It has worked in doing what it is supposed to, but the tested method can be further improved. For the patches to stick better, it is an advantage to attach them at home and not in the field in a hurry without any flat surfaces available.

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I would recommend 7 to 18 mph for a beginner. Advanced flyers from 2 to 30 mph, with lots of work, 4 to 22 mph with ease.

How about a general wind speed chart and which Rev should be used and with which spars?
I for one get little tidbits here and there and am in a quest to find it all on one page.....
So many choices ....2-3-4 wrap.... green rods....diamonds....custom....
Full sail ,vent ,mid vent, xtra vent......indoor....sle....
Just curious. I know it depends on the flier, but a general idea of what to pull from opk bag or mine
Thanks and I'm still going to have fun......🤙🏻


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You may find this helpful:

 

Wind range chart.png

beaufortscale.png

As far as spars are concerned, the general rule of thumb is the frame that originally came with the kite from the factory for the kite's manufacturer-recommended wing range. The amount of variation, substitution and hybridization of frames for whatever existing conditions, are only limited by imagination and wind speed. You can find lots of info on this forum if you search the topics. Most of the spars available for Rev kites have been weighed, measured and tested for amount of flex and response time. The numbers presented are guidelines and not written in stone. You will eventually develop a feel for what works best for you. You would probably not like the setup I use, and I would probably prefer mine over yours. Wind speed, quality, intent and personal preference determine the ideal setup for existing conditions. Except for the obvious, like using spars that are too weak for the wind speed/gusts and will snap easily, it entirely depends on your intent and style. There is no "when this happens, use this" formula, only a range of possibilities for which you will develop a feel with time.

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I would recommend 7 to 18 mph for a beginner. Advanced flyers from 2 to 30 mph, with lots of work, 4 to 22 mph with ease.

Just wondering if flying a vented (not extra vented) in 30mph would you not risk stretching the sail?

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Not flying a full vent in 30 mph. Way too much pull, even with brakes set at as much as they can! Going X/V way before then.

Once a sail stretches - no return to what it was before!! But if that is all you have and want to fly ..........

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17 minutes ago, JWharton said:

Just wondering if flying a vented (not extra vented) in 30mph would you not risk stretching the sail?

Yes. The question is: Do you want to fly, or do you want to watch? Every time you fly a kite you are stretching the sail material. It is inevitable. It's only a matter of time. What you have in your quiver, or borrow from others, determines what you will fly. The manufacturer's recommended wind range takes this into account. In time you will be able to fly in lower than recommended wind and this will keep the stretch to a minimum. 

In winds 30mph and up, those who are still flying are using holes with some edging material as kites. They are known as "Vickies" (Victoria's Secrets), and are not made commercially. When it's over 30mph I prefer a beer at the (indoor) bar.

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In 30MPH, (if I'm not flying a foil in the buggy) I'm flying the homemade #1.. large.x-bridles.jpg.f1335d936f9123b4f58e

If it breaks, I sew it back. It is literally the wind I built it for, duct Tape and all. It'll cover the broad stroke of wind 15-20mph+ at Jockey's Ridge..

 

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I wonder how it looks like when a quad sail gets stretched and how it feels like using it. Is it possible to do some advanced kite surgery to save the sail by redoing some seams and add or take away material to compensate for the stretch?

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The stretch isn't linear but a bit more spherical..you  COULD split it and tighten it up but at that point there's a new weakest point. once the sail is no longer flat, it no longer will be flat nor can it easily be made flat. Better to let it be and use it to protect your other sails from getting similarly stretched..

As for the way it flies, assuming a rough Symmetry, it just flaps harder and acts sluggish.. Again, worth avoiding and if already there, live with the choice that was made by preventing a recurrence.

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You may find this helpful:
 
5982124155b0c_Windrangechart.thumb.png.0ceb490e73c803b51ea9c1ee9185b142.png
beaufortscale.thumb.png.90f0385582226f87f10575e05cf42e05.png
As far as spars are concerned, the general rule of thumb is the frame that originally came with the kite from the factory for the kite's manufacturer-recommended wing range. The amount of variation, substitution and hybridization of frames for whatever existing conditions, are only limited by imagination and wind speed. You can find lots of info on this forum if you search the topics. Most of the spars available for Rev kites have been weighed, measured and tested for amount of flex and response time. The numbers presented are guidelines and not written in stone. You will eventually develop a feel for what works best for you. You would probably not like the setup I use, and I would probably prefer mine over yours. Wind speed, quality, intent and personal preference determine the ideal setup for existing conditions. Except for the obvious, like using spars that are too weak for the wind speed/gusts and will snap easily, it entirely depends on your intent and style. There is no "when this happens, use this" formula, only a range of possibilities for which you will develop a feel with time.

Couldn't read the charts.....but I understand....so much to learn so little time....currently I have three wrap ,two wrap, and green race rods....
I like the flex in the greens , and they seem to be right between the 2-3 wrap in "feel" I usually like winds 15 mph or less and with the standard sail b-series I can keep her in the air in very little wind , less than 2-3 mph with a bunch of " English" however I am curious....with my full vent just how much it can handle before kablooey....
I've heard of flyers out past thirty mph and frankly I'm headed inside at thirty. Just keep realizing the more I learn there is so much more to learn.......thanks .....Joe 🤙🏻


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Anything over 15, it's time to bring out a vented kite and put the standard sail away. 

Don't know if you are aware of it, but if you left click on images it will show you a magnified version. The Beaufort scale chart is kind of fuzzy anyway, but you can look at a crisper version of it if you Google it.

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Anything over 15, it's time to bring out a vented kite and put the standard sail away. 
Don't know if you are aware of it, but if you left click on images it will show you a magnified version. The Beaufort scale chart is kind of fuzzy anyway, but you can look at a crisper version of it if you Google it.

And when should I bring down my vented, two screen panels on each side, B series also......? 20-25 mph?


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It is an individual thing on when to switch. For some, it's when the leading edge starts to bend "too much" for their liking, for others when the "feel" starts to feel wrong. My point is there are no hard and fast rules on when. I survived a stroke and look to put on a vented as fast as I can, if conditions allow. Rather work to keep the kite flying before suffering a face plant. Others love the thrill of going fast, so they hold out on any changes til they have to. I fly a lot of team - someone always becomes our guinea pig! "Yeah, you got that setup?" "Go fly it and tell us what you think!" Then they come back and as a group we decide on some common setup based off of those experiences. Works most times!

My very general and overlapping ranges: Ashes (sul) - 2-7 mph, std - 6-10, mid - 9-15, f/v - 14-18, x/v 16 -? A very rough guess based on guesswork. I don't own a wind gauge, the hair on my neck and ears work for me! I usually setup something, try it. go from there! YMMV

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My very general and overlapping ranges: Ashes (sul) - 2-7 mph, std - 6-10, mid - 9-15, f/v - 14-18, x/v 16 -? A very rough guess based on guesswork. I don't own a wind gauge, the hair on my neck and ears work for me! I usually setup something, try it. go from there! YMMV


This is a master flyer wind Matrix I agree with sul, std and mid vented wind range but you use the full vented since 14 mph ! Waoou not sure I am skilled enough but I will give it a try because I've figured out the low wind range of the mid-vented so full vented may also be flyable in more low wind than I think.

Thierry Bressure

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