Fluke

Dual line bridles

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hello all. I've been searching around on the web but can't really get a straight answer. i've found books about ratios and %'s but that was getting overcomplicated really fast.

Is there a rule of thumb when it comes to designing bridles for dlk? 

i tried to redo the bridle of one of my chinese made kites by eyeballing the overall line geometry of my higher end ones but to be honest i have no idea what i'm doing

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Go here http://wardley.org/index.html click "kites", then start reading. Warning: Plan to spend at least a couple of hours -- there's a lot of info and you WILL get sidetracked.

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So no short cuts.. I`ll have to break out the calculators and trigonometry lessons then.. good thing i`m using a $5 kite for my experiments :lol:. oh btw where do you get bridle lines? i almost always see flying lines.

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It all about the wind your flying in, the weight of your kite, the pitch you adjust the bridle at, the strength of line you attaching, and trial and error, .. it all is between the thumb and pointer finger, it is a great feeling when you grasp it

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It's a small delta. About 1m20 wide. The stock lines were way off and the kite had no pull or drive at all. It just floated here and there. So i eyeballed the bridle on my hypnotist and added a knot ladder to the upper bridle for some adjustability. I have yet to try it out.

IMG_20171108_170624.jpg

Sent from my HUAWEI VNS-L21 using KiteLife mobile app

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Btw at $4.99 shipped on ebay. I'm trying to find ways to make it better since i know some people who bought similar kites and get frustrated really fast with it. So if i can help them out with it i will

Sent from my HUAWEI VNS-L21 using KiteLife mobile app

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you want to make three perfect triangle points , from leading edge toward center t should be bout an inch below t and half inch below and before center t .. from below t and to upper leading edge should meet bout inch beyond upper leading edge, and from center t and upper leading edge should come bout an inch or less . You want bridle points to make pyramids when you lay them down toward leading edge

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i'll take a pic of what it looks like this afternoon. basically when laid flat (not to scale) and pulling on the bridles it looks like this. I like tinkering :)

 

bridle.jpg

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On 11/9/2017 at 9:50 AM, Fluke said:

Is there a rule of thumb when it comes to designing bridles for dlk? 


Well not one rule of thumb but a few instead, but not too difficult or long to follow. A nice bonus is the images of related knots: 

http://www.iannewham.com/kitedesign/bridling.html

I think this page could be suitable for some project aiming at learning about bridle adjustments (and certainly for me it is one of the "ought to learn more of" things).

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The Home > Kite Design > Bridling as well as other stuff in Ian Newham's Site ( http://www.iannewham.com/kitedesign/bridling.html ) was really a nice reading. Clear, pedagogic and well structured. I'll give you the a short description of the article (below), for the purpose of luring you into reading it and to discuss the contents. Also next time travelling, why not instead of killing time with your phone, bring a cord or two and practice the knots from the knot section and memorize the rules of thumb!

The text raised, however excellent, two questions:

  • How can these two sentences be true at the same time?: "low and wide is good for roll-ups and other pitch tricks" and "a light nose forward bridle makes flic-flacs (fade/flare) easier". Isn't a flic-flack a pitch based trick? You can't move the POI forwards and backwards at the same time (OK the word "wide" increased complexity somewhat).
  • In the section "Bridle Effects on Pitch Tricks", moving the tow points (=POI?) towards the spreaders (=low/backwards?) requires the towpoints to be moved out. Why? - Not to have immense oversteer?

Not mentioned is the effect of a deep vs a shallow bridle (but I'm quite happy with what I got from the article anyhow).

Bridling Abstract (of Ian Newham's article)

Pre Intro and Footer
Nice perspective to make a time-less article (or rather aware if the time). The IMO excellent contents is under some share alike licence.

Introduction
Good (and humble) terminology walk through.

Point of Influence and Feel
Intruding the concept of "point of influence" (POI) and giving a intuitive turntable simile of the effect when moving that around. Also relate shifts along the three bridle legs to: beginner kites, "current" French style and late nineties British kites.

Knots
Use and images of: Larkshead, Locked larkshead, Prussik, Sheet bend, Overhand knot, Double overhand knot, Double overhand knot cinched up, Pigtail with overhand knot, Pigtail with double overhand knot, Inhaul attached to pigtail with sheet bend, outhauls larksheaded onto inhaul and A common way to assemble a 3 point bridle

Rule of Thumb Turbo Bridle
Layout, howto description and advice. Directly to the essentials in an easily accessible way. Author's first choice of bridle try.

Rule of Thumb Static Bridle
Layout, howto description and advice. Directly to the essentials in an easily accessible way. (Three point) French style bridle.

Tuning
High and low wind bridle tuning - nose back/forwards.

Bridle Effects in Slack Line Moves
I took the liberty of expressing heavy setting and light nose in terms of POI here:

  • POI low and wide: backspins, roll-ups and pitch based tricks in general.
  • POI high: "flick-flacks (flare-fade)
  • POI inwards: "speed up spin tricks like axels and 540s"
  • POI inwards and low: (tip) "stabs and black holes"

Bridle Effects on Pitch Tricks
Turntable simile again, but here around the LSs. To make a more pitch happy (and back spin) kite move POI towards the LS (i.e. low?). This will require the POI to be moved outward "in order to keep the kite flyable" - cost: turns, axels and flatspins "becomes more sluggish".

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Thanks, i'll read it when i get the time

I got to test my "invention" and it handles much better. actually has a little pull now. i also experimented with turbo (no theory behind it. just hooked the inhaul further down the tow point) and it calmed the kite down.

 

I need to get some bridle lines and try out other configurations. starting to get the logic behind all that

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