Kite Boarding

Quickly becoming one of the hot facets of power kiting, kite boarding is something else... Imagine a big skateboard with knobby wheels, and you've got it!

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  1. Starting kiteboarding

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  2. New NEO 11

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  3. Burlington Ice Fly

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  4. Cool New Site

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  5. First flight

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  6. Hill Head landboarding action

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    • This is an example of the carabiner and line wraps and the red line is where the laundry would hang.
    • This is one area that I really enjoy... (Sled and Flo-Form Fan)..  What I do is use a large lifter kite (Look at my Photo album in Bio if you wish) depending on the wind.. But what we prefer 24 or 36 Sleds on days where winds are between 8-20 mph. I always go overboard on line when hanging laundry also. 250lb for the 24 Sled and 500 lb for the 36 Sled.  My preferred method is carabiner vs. line loops. I attach line laundry with a carabiner and wrap the main sled line at minimum three times around the carabiner . I equally space my laundry (using arm lengths to measure) with the laundry with most drag towards the anchor side. You may have to adjust the amount of laundry depending on winds and what the pilot kite can hold steady.  On the laundry side, I use sturdier/bigger/heavier gauge carabiner (Aluminum for light weight) for heavier laundry and smaller for lighter laundry.   
    • When you set up to fly, check everything! Visually inspect for twists and tangles in the bridle. Check the bridle settings and the Prussik knots to make sure everything is symmetrical and locked in. Verify that your lines are of equal length. Verify wind direction. Relax. Launch. Fly. Smile. Breathe. Rinse and repeat. You'll have less and less days like that as time goes on and you begin to do some of the basics automatically, without thinking about it. You'll eventually be able to tell the lines are off, one second after you launch. It gets easier every time. Hang in there. You'll survive. Take frequent breaks. Choose your wind so it will help you. If the wind sucks don't fly. In time you'll be able to fly in that crap and you won't realize it happened until you're flying in it. It's all about time on the lines. You'll hear that phrase repeated often. Experience beats the crap out of everything else. You'll get there. You've already covered a good portion of that distance. P.S. -- There's only one s and two i's in shiitake (shitsake).
    • i forget to mention something important. each inflatable will have his own pull so.... kite line must to have the strength for  kite plus the laundry pull. almost for sure that is the reason you see it (on your opinion) to big kite lines used by flyers.  
    • Yes Exactly Wayne, ITW.  I like them a lot both kite and Company.  I think with some laundry twirling and the kite about  200ft up will be real nice, Get one of those alligator anchor Bags for my girl to see and the kite will be pretty