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wich kite to choose?


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Hi everyone. My name is James and I am from Grandview, Missouri. I currently do not own a kite. I started looking into kites as a hobby the whole family may enjoy together. The stunt kites really cough my attention. After looking at a ton of different online retailers and their selection of beginner stunt kites for a few weeks now I find that selection of them is many. I need help, I have no idea as to what to get and who to get it from lol. :confused!: I subscribed to kitelife because this looks like the best place to get help.

Thanks,

James

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I highly agree with this. As stated, I flew dual line first, and hopping onto a rev, I could instantly tell that this would be easier to advance on. Dual lines are great for tricking, but the tricks

I know there are a few good fests somewhat "on the circuit" in Oklahoma and Illinois, I'm sure there's some stuff closer too, but you might very pop onto the Rev forum and post outright - "who's in my

Hi James, and welcome.

Kites are thae same as pretty much everything in life, you get pretty much what you pay for.

Depending on how much you are prepared to pay the World is a pretty big place, kite wise.

Also for getting the family involved, you need to consider do you buy one, which all take turns with, or a bunch that you can fly as a team, or as individuals.

I am afraid I am biased and would suggest you invest in a Quad line Kite called a Revolution, this is what I mainly fly. I bought most of mine frem Theresa at Thekiteshoppe.com she has a shop in Washington Stat I believe is the right description.

Suppose the best advice I can offer is to have a look at pretty much any of the stores featured in the Kitelife Home page, they are ALL good folks. Contact them by phone or email and they will try to point you in the right direction. If you can find a shop local to you I am sure they wold be happy for you to drop in and shoot the breeze.

If you can at all, try B4 you buy. Maybe get to a couple of the Kitefestivals that will be up and on the way with the better weather.

One thing I am SURE of, you have asked your question in the right place.Others will chip in that have much more experience than me. You might even find another Forum user who is in your neck of the woods.

Best of luck.

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Welcome James! :D

Have you tuned into the main differences between dual and quad line?

Dual line examples:

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=2BzGeKmgKUA

Quad line examples:

The way I describe it, dual line kites are like an agile attack jet, Revs are like maneuverable attack helicopters.

I love both dearly, having enjoyed both for over 20 years now. :D

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Hi James,

Welcome to :D

Two things for sure: You sure picked the right site to come to for kite help. I've been flying for a little over a year and a half and learned almost everything I know (including recently getting into the Revs.-Quads) from the great people here! And secondly...you sure picked a great state for flying a kite in! I lived in Joplin for awhile and Missouri certainly has wind!!

I started flying with a Prism Quantum Fire (dual line) and I think it's about the best kite "I" could have ever started with...mainly because I crashed a awful lot. And the Quantum can really take a beating. It has a shock absorber mechanism in it's tail which makes breaking parts "almost" difficult--although I managed too break a part once in awhile. :D I later got two more, one for my wife and one for my son. I still have a difficult time doing a lot of tricks with it, but for learing AND just having fun ripping the sky apart, I love it...flew it today when I was teaching a guy how to fly!

But, as said, a lot of the "what-to-buy" question depends on how much you want to spend. I bought my first Quantum for about $75 (which to me at the time was a hell of a lot to spend on a kite), but today they are running about $90 to $100+ in most shops (eBay sometimes has them at less cost, saw one at $64 awhile back).

I don't have experience on other kites at that level, so I'll let someone else fill you in there. I know there are a lot of them and it "is" mind-boggling in the beginning! :confused!: :)

Keep It Up!

Duane

PS John...I still don't know how you kept from falling off that pier!! :wacko:;)

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thank you for the welcome. I am aware of the differences between duel line and quad. Never paid much attention to the quads till I came here and watched some videos. Them Revs are so sexy the way they fly and look, I really like videos of them like your dock one you posted above. As for Revs., would a person with no experiences in dual or quad line kites have a hard time learning to fly?

IDK like I was saying so many choices......

BTW @ kitelife love your avatar.

James

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I think it's relative... A lot of these guys were in your shoes just a few months ago, and will be able to speak on it directly.

However, here's my other essential breakdown:

In my opinion, without any prior knowledge or resources, dual lines are easier to learn (in theory) because they're linear, the fly forward under tension, it's easy to grasp.

With a little bit of basic knowledge (first-hand or via forums), I'd say the Rev is an easier kite to learn and fly, certainly to advance on.

The dual line kites require more hand speed to get really good at, and a certain degree of athleticism, whereas anyone can fly a Rev, in nearly any wind.

FYI, the avatar was made from a real photo, shot when I was doing this (another time):

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Helloo and Welcome!! :D

I think they are both equal in the learning area, if you are a new flier. Both are very different in the way you fly them. Quads will be more expensive (higher cost of lines [x4 instead of x2], handles), and duals will be a touch cheaper (correct me someone if Im wrong here) with being able to buy different 'classes' (beginner, intermediate, competition classes).

I started off on a dual line kite and had a blast for a year on them before getting my first Rev last week.

But its really a matter of taste.

If you know someone with a dual or a quad, give both of them a whirl.

If you just 'want to get out there' and fly, go pick yourself up a dual line kite -- "Level One Jump", a "New Tech Cherry Bomb", a "Prism Nexus" or a "Prism Quantum". All of those are under $100 (the "Jump" is around $120, but well worth it in my opinion), and will get you out there flying in no time.

You can troll around the internet and pick up a Revolution SLE for around $200, and may be able to find lines included, so all you'd have to buy are handles. It's WELL WORTH the investment in my opinion -- Rev's are just so darn fun!!!

Hope that helps (although I may have made your choice a little harder. lol) :D

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Helloo and Welcome!! :D

I think they are both equal in the learning area, if you are a new flier. Both are very different in the way you fly them. Quads will be more expensive (higher cost of lines [x4 instead of x2], handles), and duals will be a touch cheaper (correct me someone if Im wrong here) with being able to buy different 'classes' (beginner, intermediate, competition classes).

I'd add that Rev's are WAY harder to break, and within 6 months, with broken spars on a dual line, you'll likely to 'break' even anyway.

So for a kite that I will not be disappointed in I need to be looking at the ones around or above $100? Thanks for every ones reply being a great help.

For a first dual line kite, I think that's a really fair price point to look at... There are some very good, durable kites out there for that price.

Not trick monsters or precision demons granted, but good all around fliers that will "ramp you up" to a point where you can consider more specialized kites in the future. :D

For Revs, the "jump in" point is around $160 or so for a Revolution EXP.

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I've been flying a Rev. (I bought for me wife...heehee) for about a month (4 or 5 good outings) and got a "Black Rainbow Rev." for Christmas. And with the help from many at this site, I'm doing really great...and I'm over 60 (with less then real fast reactions, heehee!) :D

Which is easiest (duals or Revs) "I" don't think I could say, because they are so different...but I love them both! :D:wacko:

Keep It Up!

Duane

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With a little bit of basic knowledge (first-hand or via forums), I'd say the Rev is an easier kite to learn and fly, certainly to advance on.

The dual line kites require more hand speed to get really good at, and a certain degree of athleticism, whereas anyone can fly a Rev, in nearly any wind.

I highly agree with this. As stated, I flew dual line first, and hopping onto a rev, I could instantly tell that this would be easier to advance on.

Dual lines are great for tricking, but the tricks get harder. And boy.... Do they get harder. lol A lot of dual fliers out there have practiced for years and years to master tricks. They make it look SO easy. lol

So, here what I think.... Get a dual AND a quad!! :D I promise you wont regret it! :D

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With a little bit of basic knowledge (first-hand or via forums), I'd say the Rev is an easier kite to learn and fly, certainly to advance on.

The dual line kites require more hand speed to get really good at, and a certain degree of athleticism, whereas anyone can fly a Rev, in nearly any wind.

I highly agree with this. As stated, I flew dual line first, and hopping onto a rev, I could instantly tell that this would be easier to advance on.

Dual lines are great for tricking, but the tricks get harder. And boy.... Do they get harder. lol A lot of dual fliers out there have practiced for years and years to master tricks. They make it look SO easy. lol

So, here what I think.... Get a dual AND a quad!! :D I promise you wont regret it! ;)

John & Jon...you have really upset Desting & Serenity (my Nirvana UL & STD)! :D

I'd suggest going with a less expensive dual liner first...to just get used to the whole kite show at this level, this wasn't kiting as I knew it!! I think if I had to work with just trying to set up 4 lines, instead of 2, to begin with...I would have found that very difficult. (You guys are a lot farther from the beginning then I am...and you may have forgotten the trip). As it was, with 2 line experience behind me, I had some frustrating moments getting my act together with the quad lines. (Of course, as all may tell you...I'm not the "youngest or brightest" at this stuff...just the least experienced...which counts for something!!) :wacko:

Keep It Up!

Duane

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James-

Welcome to the family! I got my family involved in kiting a few years back (2005), and it's been a great family activity. I didn't say "hobby", because it's not at the same level for all family members. I wanted to share our experiences. Although we, as a family, have flown kites before, it was on the level of "hey, we're going to the beach, we should fly kites!". I've been flying kites (single line and dual line) since 1986, on a casual level. In 2005, I attended my first real kite festival. That brought back a lot of memories and spurred my interest to a new level. I bought a couple of dual line kites that year (again, flying solo, and not getting involved in the kiting community). By January 2006, we had joined the AKA, and attended our fist kite festival at South Padre Island as a family- and as volunteers, not as spectators. And we had a blast- learning to fly big inflatables, and putting some of our new single line kites in the air.

Soon after, we became involved in our local kite club, and was introduced to many kitefliers. This is a crucial point, and one I'll get back to.

In the following years and after many festivals (again, as volunteers), and getting involved with other kiters, my family members have found their niches: I fly on a dual line team (Austin End Of The Line), as well as a new quad line team (Quadzilla). I'm also more involved in the AKA. For me, kiting has become tied as my #1 hobby (my other is as a musician, for the past 35 years). My wife helps at all of the kite festivals, loves our single lines and flies them when we have time- not really into dual lines, can be persuaded to fly quad line once in a blue moon- and our kite team operates at a much less efficient level when she's not around (she's pretty amazing about getting things done and making things happen). My daughter, now a teenager, likes quads and power kites (and flies with me on Quadzilla), but is not rabid about kiting. My son, almost a teenager, will fly dual lines occasionally, gets bored with a single line in seconds, and loves flying our dual-line bar controlled power kite- and I definitely see him getting into kite buggys and maybe kite surfing. My kids like kite festivals since they have lots to do and there's lots of people- they're very social. We like the kite community because of the camaraderie and long term friendships we've made with people all over the country. It means something different to each family member- but as a whole, kite festivals are our family activity.

OK, back to the local kite club. I could not have made the decisions I've made about "what kite do I really want", and might have saved some money by talking to the kite club first. Or not... you know how it is when a hobbyist gets gear acquisition syndrome. :-) But it helped me from making some mistakes about what to buy and why. And it let me explore some things, since different kitefliers in our kite club are into different kites... some like fighters more, some like single line art, some are into dual lines only, some are into quad lines only. But I did get to borrow some kites, learn how to fly them, why I want to spend $300 on a artisan-made kite instead of spending possibly more on lesser kites getting to that level- or why I don't want to buy the latest and greatest of everything, because I might not be wired for radical tricks on a dual line, for example. Getting involved with local kitefliers is important for your own growth into kiting as a hobby- or at least (and maybe more importantly), to make a whole new group of friends. :-)

To your question about what to get: I find dual line kites are fast, fun and exciting. I find quad lines to be more about inner peace. I found that I like flying with other people than flying solo, although I do a lot of solo flying to improve my technique to make team flying better. And I LOVE my single line kites... I have a great collection of flying art, and I don't get a lot of time to fly them at kite festivals because I'm either there to help facilitate the festival or I'm there as a demo pilot. Sometimes it's good to just take some time, put some flying art into the sky and watch it dance with the wind.

Just don't get something because it's less expensive. You can often find something used and of much better quality (and the benefit of being proven flight-worthy!) and it will save you lots of frustration later on. I compare it to someone learning to play guitar. If you don;t get an instrument that can be played well, then the frustration of bad sound and difficult playing might turn what might have been a master musician away from the art. You'll find that buying used from anyone on this or other kite forums out there will net you a good deal- for the most part we kitefliers are a close knit community and a pretty honest lot. And buying something of quality also means it's easier to upgrade if you decide to sell your kites to upgrade to other kites (to some pilots out there, this is sacrilege- never sell a kite! LOL! :D ).

Ask lots of questions. We're here to help if we can!

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There you go James, told you this was the right place to ask.

Dont think it is making your decision any easier though.

Just be assured, whichever way you decide to go, even if it is not to get a kit at all. You will find a good welcome on here, with plenty of advice.

Best of luck, be sure to let us know what you decide.

I still hope you will get a person in your area post a reply so you can have some "hands on" advice.

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WOW!!! "Dagnabbit" That was really GOOD!! Being an almost lone kiter down here...it almost brought a tear to my eye. But, really that was well said, thank you, from me!! (but could you do something about your avatar, please?!?!) :crazy::)

Keep It Up!

Duane

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I'd be careful with a lot of the advice. Most people want you to validate their choices by convincing you to do likewise. Assume me included :crazy:

Looking at my history, the best buy I ever made was an X-Kites DC Sport 70. Best because it is VERY inexpensive (lots on eBay and at your local kite shop for less than $30), and because it is fairly slow and easy to learn the basics of Dual line flight. It is perfectly adequate to learn the basics, then you can move on to the better kites everyone suggests. The DC Sport 60 will be a bit faster, but can be obtained for less than $20.

That will get you started, or you may decide you don't like sports kites, or don't like dual line. If you decide to proceed, then check out the other recommendations. There are much better kites, but none can teach a beginner the basics better these kites. By basics, I mean straight line flights, wind-window edge stalls, loops, spins, basic landings. You need to learn these before the "slack line tricks" anyway, so go inexpensive until you are ready to proceed. Then gift the DC Sport to a friend who might appreciate it.

I would suggest avoiding most "beginner kites" at first. They are usually smaller, faster, and a little harder to learn the basics. (AND more expensive than my recommendations.) When you start to learn "tricks", you will want to skip right to the intermediate-advanced kites, 6 to 8 feet width (3/4 to "full" size), see the above recommendations. The only small kite I like flying is the Micron - very small, very fast, very not-novice. Also, quite expensive for its size. I use it to test my old reflexes.

Note: I and my wife and brother and nephew flew the DC Sport kite for only part of a season. I gifted it to my wife's son who had a blast flying it on his vacation. Not bad for the price. It's frame is fiber glass, heavy but usable and rugged. It frequently "popped" frame members, but that gives you valuable experience landing a crippled kite and reassembling it (I am not kidding! Most kites will pop frame members, but it does not damage the kite if you can get it to the ground without smashing it.) By "pop" I mean members come apart at their joints, which are simply slide together tenon joints. No damage that needs repairs.

As for Dual :) V. Quad :blushing: - I love them both. I do not do the "slack line" tricks in duals - I like more dance-like flying :P :P So the transition to Quads was not as hard for me as for some. I would suggest a cheap dual (there are NO cheap usable quads) to start. If you really like kites, then *definitely* try a quad.

BTW - talking to one of the kite store owners in Long Beach, he agreed with these specific ideas for newbies.

Fer Watt Its Wert..

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Thank you every one for all your post. Got way more response then I thought I would and fast to boot. Also a big thanks for the extremely warm welcomes. You all are an outstanding bunch and I am glad to be a member.

James M.

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I did join the KCKC "Kansas City Kite Club" about a week ago and they have nothing showing any festivals anytime soon. Also does not look like they have any kind of place to look for some one to kite with to check it out. But it is the place I found the link that brought me here. :crazy:

James

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Well, one good turn and all that... http://kckiteclub.org/

Glad to have you here James, the more the merrier.

There are a couple of busier forums, but you'll be hard pressed to find any more consistently friendly and helpful.

Except for the Rev forum of course, but we have a big overlap in membership between the two. :crazy:

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James,

One additional idea. Revolution (quad kites) has demo-kites and instructors at most(?) kite festivals. They are very helpful and anxious to let you try a quad kite under a little tutelage. Be sure to take advantage of any opportunity.

Fair winds.

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