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The Winds won today.


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Got to the field this morning after equalizing the lines on my Rev SLE. Wind felt like it was around 8-10 mph. Got everything set up, and the wind just quit. I would prop the Rev up on the leading edge, with the wind coming from the East, and walk towards the handles, turn around and watch the wind blow the kite over because now the wind was coming from the west. Switch everything around after waiting for 5 minutes or so, and same thing happened in the opposite direction. Then dead calm. Wound up my lines, and fold up the kite, walking home, and the wind starts blowing again. Set it up again, same thing all over. Fold it up, and head for the house. After lunch Plan B.. Get out my 4D.. Get to the field after lunch and set up the 4D, and the wind starts blowing like crazy. plus 10 mph at least. Fold the 4D back up, back to the house ( now this is a 10 minute walk either way, cause I live next to the park, in fact I can see the field where I fly from my upstairs computer room as I type this post.)

Get the Rev, back to the field, still blowing, set up the Rev, and the wind stops and starts changing direction again and then quits. I wait 15 minutes, and still no wind. Back to get the 4D again, after folding the Rev an winding the lines. Now I get back with the 4D, and there isn't enough wind to launch the 4D. Pack it back up and call it a day. Oh well, mucho practice setting up and folding up kites.

Just pulled up www.caniflymykite.com and it says No winds 0.0 mph.

Then I go to www.windfinder.com and see what is reporting and it says 9mph......... So far my confidence in windfinder.com on a scale from 1 to 10 is about a minus 4.

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The variability of wind is something you just have to get used to. A lot of it comes from knowing your flying locations. Wind behaviour changes throughout the year and over time you'll get to know fro

You'll freak, if you ever get to fly in coastal winds, coming off the water. Just think.........10 mph, steady as a rock, constant as the surf, coming in off of a light chop............. You can fl

Trust me, it's not just you ! I have had many a day, EXACTLY as you just described. Actually, I believe it's the squirrels ! I think they watch from the trees, and radio to the Wind Gods.

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This is why a lot of us bring multiple kites to the field when we go out. :) Next time just bring both kites out, so you don't have to walk back home to get the other one if the wind decides to switch on you. Depending on how empty your fields is, how comfortable you feel, etc. you could even leave the first kite set up if the wind forces you to get the other one out. Revs pretty much won't take off on you by themselves if parked leading edge down no matter which way the wind switches around to; dual lines you may have to be a little more careful.

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For sure, that's good advice. I have had as many as three Revs (Standard, Mid-Vent & Full-Vent), all set up and staked out, side by side. Still, you will have very discouraging days, like today, simply because the winds tend to swirl inland, especially when it's light. They are just NOT locked in, and steady, like at the coast, or in a tremendously large field. :ani_wallbash:

You'll get that perfect day, sooner or later, and it'll all be worth it.

Remember, it's really important, that the area behind you, be clear of obstructions, a long ways back. There's some kind of "rule of thumb", that says if there is a 100' tall obstruction, behind you, then you need to be at least 7 times that height (700'), out in front of that obstruction, in order to get fairly clean air. Again, that's some kind of "rule of thumb", give or take........ Clean air is nice !

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You will learn a few kitisms as you progress.

1.The best way to get wind is to not fly that day.

2.Another way to get wind is to pack up your kite.

3.Best way to get gale force winds is buy a UL or Sul kite.

4.Best way to guarantee no wind is buy a vented kite.

5.Sometimes we lay out an extra kite, just so we can pack it up to generate wind.

Seriously, bring quite a few kites with you. Enough to cover all wind conditions so you can fly no matter what the wind is or isn't.

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I resemble this topic, all of the above posts. The start comment & then the learning along the way that has me to where I am today in my KiteLife. I do the multiple set up. I have the "ironic winds" while at work. I consider setting up & tearing down useful practice. Set Revs up leading edge up many times knowing I can maybe have a chance of launching when there's not anything but puffs. (Had only one self launch, so far). I have learned light wind flying, no wind flying, gliding, ground recovery, kite repair, wind direction changing flying, power flying, stack flying and so it goes. Have a new vented Rev due today so you can guess what the wind might be. And once in a while all the stars align & I get a woo whoo day. The conclusion of the matter is now I can fly something, somehow, if I choose to. In that lies quite a bit of effort & now satisfaction. Still plenty more to learn. I'm working on it.

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I resemble this topic, all of the above posts. The start comment & then the learning along the way that has me to where I am today in my KiteLife. I do the multiple set up. I have the "ironic winds" while at work. I consider setting up & tearing down useful practice. Set Revs up leading edge up many times knowing I can maybe have a chance of launching when there's not anything but puffs. (Had only one self launch, so far). I have learned light wind flying, no wind flying, gliding, ground recovery, kite repair, wind direction changing flying, power flying, stack flying and so it goes. Have a new vented Rev due today so you can guess what the wind might be. And once in a while all the stars align & I get a woo whoo day. The conclusion of the matter is now I can fly something, somehow, if I choose to. In that lies quite a bit of effort & now satisfaction. Still plenty more to learn. I'm working on it.

Enjoy your new Rev!!!!!

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You will learn a few kitisms as you progress.

1.The best way to get wind is to not fly that day.

2.Another way to get wind is to pack up your kite.

3.Best way to get gale force winds is buy a UL or Sul kite.

4.Best way to guarantee no wind is buy a vented kite.

5.Sometimes we lay out an extra kite, just so we can pack it up to generate wind.

Seriously, bring quite a few kites with you. Enough to cover all wind conditions so you can fly no matter what the wind is or isn't.

LOL, and true.....

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The other thing to bear in mind with weather stations is that they are not necessarily measuring the wind at the ground. A windfinder or canifly wind measurement may be coming from an instrument that is 30-50 feet off of the ground. The wind is stronger up there than right at the ground...smoother too. Have patience, my friend. The day will come.

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The variability of wind is something you just have to get used to. A lot of it comes from knowing your flying locations. Wind behaviour changes throughout the year and over time you'll get to know from various indicators what conditions are likely to be at your flying spot. For years I lived about 5 miles south of my field and the main weather station was about 2 miles east of the field. From looking at the wind in my neighborhood and checking the readings from the weather station I could pretty well tell you what was happening at the field. The main thing is getting comfortable with the decision to fly or not. I know the kinds of conditions when I might not even bother (usually variable conditions like what you describe). Who needs the frustration.

Variable speed mayb be tough, especially when starting out, but gets to be less of an issue with kite selection and skilz. Variable direction is always a headache. Short lines and good sneakers can help... :-) In my area variable winds are often pretty easy to forcast. When a storm is coming the wind shifts direction and comes over a metro area and while stronger, tends to be pretty crappy. Unstable wind, not just variable, can be impossible sometimes. This is often caused not just by weather but by site conditions. Heat sources and obstructions upwind can make wind that's like oatmeal. A big obstruction like a city tends to make wind unstable.

While learning your local wind patterns a site that provides data from lots of sources is handy. I use Wunderground.com. The commercial stations (often airports) tend to be the most reliable, but neighborhood stations can be great, once you know where they are and if they are accurate. A lot of weather stations don't pay much attention to wind speed. A lot of them may have wind measurements which are totally meaningless. But, sometimes they are great. A local high school has thier anemometer about 50' up on a radio mast and there are no nearby obstructions. Thier local data is good. A nearby firestation has their wind meter on the wrong side of a three story building with trees nearby. Useless.

Once you get used to your local conditions this stuff isn't needed so much, but it sure can teach you a lot about the wind.post-275-0-06094000-1392755975_thumb.png

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The variability of wind is something you just have to get used to. A lot of it comes from knowing your flying locations. Wind behaviour changes throughout the year and over time you'll get to know from various indicators what conditions are likely to be at your flying spot. For years I lived about 5 miles south of my field and the main weather station was about 2 miles east of the field. From looking at the wind in my neighborhood and checking the readings from the weather station I could pretty well tell you what was happening at the field. The main thing is getting comfortable with the decision to fly or not. I know the kinds of conditions when I might not even bother (usually variable conditions like what you describe). Who needs the frustration.

Variable speed mayb be tough, especially when starting out, but gets to be less of an issue with kite selection and skilz. Variable direction is always a headache. Short lines and good sneakers can help... :-) In my area variable winds are often pretty easy to forcast. When a storm is coming the wind shifts direction and comes over a metro area and while stronger, tends to be pretty crappy. Unstable wind, not just variable, can be impossible sometimes. This is often caused not just by weather but by site conditions. Heat sources and obstructions upwind can make wind that's like oatmeal. A big obstruction like a city tends to make wind unstable.

While learning your local wind patterns a site that provides data from lots of sources is handy. I use Wunderground.com. The commercial stations (often airports) tend to be the most reliable, but neighborhood stations can be great, once you know where they are and if they are accurate. A lot of weather stations don't pay much attention to wind speed. A lot of them may have wind measurements which are totally meaningless. But, sometimes they are great. A local high school has thier anemometer about 50' up on a radio mast and there are no nearby obstructions. Thier local data is good. A nearby firestation has their wind meter on the wrong side of a three story building with trees nearby. Useless.

Once you get used to your local conditions this stuff isn't needed so much, but it sure can teach you a lot about the wind.attachicon.gifstations.png

I like that www.wunderground.com site. Much better than what i was using , thanks.

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Well today was the opposite from yesterday. Forecast was for dead calm. I walked the dog in the park this morning and could feel a slight breeze. Went home, got out my new Prism 4D and headed for the field, figuring this would be a good day to concentrate on that kite. After I set it up, the wind picked up a bit and I would guess it was around 3-9mph. It would die every once in awhile.and the 4D would flutter or glide to the ground, but then it would pick up and I could hear the lines humming as I flew across the wind window during a gust. I would guess that I got almost 2 hours of flying in, in short flights of from 1 minute to as long as 5 minutes at a time. It was a blast, and I really like the 4D. Made a few hard nose landings, and the 4D showed no damage. It seems to be built rather well for it's size and weight. As I flew the unplanned landings grew fewer and far between, and softer. Tomorrow they forecast much stronger winds, so I am going to try and get the Rev SLE up in the air. Hope I do as well with the Rev.

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Having owned a few 4D's, watch the nose crashes, the center spine will poke through the top. I added a small amount of electrical tape around the end to add extra cushion and make it less likely to poke through. It's an easy enough fix if it does happen though. Also, the center T is another weak point. I do know they "beefed it up" a bit, just be careful. I only fly mine when the winds are really light. If it gets up around 6-8, I've got plenty other stuff to fly.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk

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Having owned a few 4D's, watch the nose crashes, the center spine will poke through the top. I added a small amount of electrical tape around the end to add extra cushion and make it less likely to poke through. It's an easy enough fix if it does happen though. Also, the center T is another weak point. I do know they "beefed it up" a bit, just be careful. I only fly mine when the winds are really light. If it gets up around 6-8, I've got plenty other stuff to fly.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk

I was thinking about using some of that GE or Permatex RTV Silicone sealant , and putting a dab of it on the nose. Shouldn't affect the weight or balance, and when it dries it is like a rubber bumper. I already order a couple of spare T's.

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One thing to keep in mind is how often your weather station reports conditions. The airport near me only updates every 20 minutes. I don't see too many stations that are reporting in real time. Some update every hour. I also pay attention to the wind arrow and look at the historical trend. The forecaster is somewhat accurate. I have to fly in variable winds, but that is factored in. It can be a pain, but you get used to checking the wind often. In fact I have several places i can fly with farm fields on several sides for the smoothest I can get. Be careful of corn though the taller it gets the more it interferes.

And setup several different kites.

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Hey Bob,

I have a friend that swears by using that plasti-dip stuff that you use on the handles of tools for nose reinforcement. After flying the 4D for a while, my son got the spine to poke through the nose on his 4D. He's a young little guy, and actually thinks it's funny to do a top speed death dive into the ground. The 4D has held up remarkably well, considering... I fixed it with the tape method, BTW.

~Rob.

post-786-0-61308800-1392813309_thumb.jpg

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Hey Bob,

I have a friend that swears by using that plasti-dip stuff that you use on the handles of tools for nose reinforcement. After flying the 4D for a while, my son got the spine to poke through the nose on his 4D. He's a young little guy, and actually thinks it's funny to do a top speed death dive into the ground. The 4D has held up remarkably well, considering... I fixed it with the tape method, BTW.

~Rob.

I bought some at the endorsement of someone on another forum. I I dipped the noses on a couple of my beater kites and dipped the handles on my workshop tools. Very versatile and very durable. I do think it added just a bit of weight, but that makes my kites a little more flippy. I'm ok with that. Although exercise caution to make sure you add it evenly on each side of the nose. Don't want it to get out of balance.

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Hey Bob,

I have a friend that swears by using that plasti-dip stuff that you use on the handles of tools for nose reinforcement. After flying the 4D for a while, my son got the spine to poke through the nose on his 4D. He's a young little guy, and actually thinks it's funny to do a top speed death dive into the ground. The 4D has held up remarkably well, considering... I fixed it with the tape method, BTW.

~Rob.

I bought some at the endorsement of someone on another forum. I I dipped the noses on a couple of my beater kites and dipped the handles on my workshop tools. Very versatile and very durable. I do think it added just a bit of weight, but that makes my kites a little more flippy. I'm ok with that. Although exercise caution to make sure you add it evenly on each side of the nose. Don't want it to get out of balance.

Going to get some at Home Depot today, thanks.

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Dipping the nose will not keep the spine from wearing through the nose fabric. In fact, once the spine has made it through the dip layer the fabric will be worse than it would have been in a normal puncture. Better to pad the inside of the nose with something replaceable. As it wears, remove it. The built in nose never wears. Usually a bumper on the end of the spine is sufficient, but I don't know how much room is in the nose pocket of a 4d. A layer of fabric between the spine and nose is good. Kevlar is usual, but anything thin and tough will do if checked and replaced frequently.

Dipping the nose on a kite that gets lots of nose abrasion can be a good idea, such one flown on asphalt or hard dirt. This is more about wear from the outside-in rather then from the spine rubbing and poking inside the nose.

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Dipping the nose on a kite that gets lots of nose abrasion can be a good idea, such one flown on asphalt or hard dirt. This is more about wear from the outside-in rather then from the spine rubbing and poking inside the nose.

You didn't see me fly when I was starting out. Let's just say my starter kites could move to the island of misfit toys.

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Circling back to the original topic regarding wind data and forecasts, I subscribe to a site called iwindsurf.com (or ikitesurf.com) and they make all of their wind data available to subscribers via an app called Wind Alert (as well the good old-fashioned website). Their meters are updated every 15 minutes. I used to windsurf a lot and found this to be a valuable tool to let me know if the wind was blowing an hour from where I lived. It provides a nice graph of the wind at the site, depicting gusts and lulls as well as the average. This gives a good feel for how steady the wind really is and if it is picking up or dropping off. Now I like this tool for their forecasting so I can plan kite flying days.

As for local flying I still use the oldest method around, I look at the leaves on the trees (aka the Beaufort scale).

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Circling back to the original topic regarding wind data and forecasts, I subscribe to a site called iwindsurf.com (or ikitesurf.com) and they make all of their wind data available to subscribers via an app called Wind Alert (as well the good old-fashioned website). Their meters are updated every 15 minutes. I used to windsurf a lot and found this to be a valuable tool to let me know if the wind was blowing an hour from where I lived. It provides a nice graph of the wind at the site, depicting gusts and lulls as well as the average. This gives a good feel for how steady the wind really is and if it is picking up or dropping off. Now I like this tool for their forecasting so I can plan kite flying days.

As for local flying I still use the oldest method around, I look at the leaves on the trees (aka the Beaufort scale).

Nice site. I already downloaded the app and put it on my Android Phone.

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