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New rev B series kite


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On the Reflex handles - try going out as far on top from the handle tip as you can and work back towards it as you find your "sweet spot". Then as you get used to that, try letting them out a knot - unless you start all the way out! - and each time see how it works. You should find yourself pretty much out on them!! Haven't seen the latest version of the Reflex handles, so not too sure on the adjustments to those, I use snagless myself. Your other handles are easily converted to no-snag, takes less than an hour to do a pair. With practice I take less than a half hour.
 

The handles on the reflex are identical in shape and size, I have to replicate the knot system from the B series to the Reflex handles they are snagless and made from carbon fiber.


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Hi, jmaldo100, and welcome to the forum. It would be good if you would post a photo of the handles that came with it. For the first flight, and this is a very general rule of thumb, set the botto

And even better news to me, just the actions and movement have made my problem hand much better. Now I don't drop my handle near as often. Big ,huge for me. I do think that the padding might help more

but at the same time you lose the fine control that many of us like about them. Being a team flier mostly, control is a very sought after thing! Speed is secondary in our needs. More important is the

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Standard handles and leaders adjust by moving the flying lines from knot to knot. The Reflex handles I saw, adjusted by moving the leader through the handle. Are yours different? Or are you thinking of locking down your Reflex handles to one spot and using knots to adjust?

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My Reflex handles were fixed and had knots much like regular handles. The only difference was the Reflex handles are snagless. While the cord does run the full length of the handle, there's no mechanism to adjut it without tying/untying knots.

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What size anchor are you using? I remove the burr totally and the screw expands the anchor enough to hold it firmly in place. I use 8-10 anchors. You do need to gently tap them into the handle rods and putting the screw in, expands it even more. Done many sets and never a failure to hold!

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What size anchor are you using? I remove the burr totally and the screw expands the anchor enough to hold it firmly in place. I use 8-10 anchors. You do need to gently tap them into the handle rods and putting the screw in, expands it even more. Done many sets and never a failure to hold!

Same size, no problem holding once tightened down. Just easier to start and get to the point where the screw expands the anchor enough to grab


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1 hour ago, Wayne Dowler said:

What size anchor are you using? I remove the burr totally and the screw expands the anchor enough to hold it firmly in place. I use 8-10 anchors. You do need to gently tap them into the handle rods and putting the screw in, expands it even more. Done many sets and never a failure to hold!

Hey Wayne, hope you are keeping up with this.  I know you are.....

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but at the same time you lose the fine control that many of us like about them. Being a team flier mostly, control is a very sought after thing! Speed is secondary in our needs. More important is the ability to launch and hover, more than straight line speed. If you just fly solo - pretty much anything goes, but in team flying - every one must play together!

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but at the same time you lose the fine control that many of us like about them. Being a team flier mostly, control is a very sought after thing! Speed is secondary in our needs. More important is the ability to launch and hover, more than straight line speed. If you just fly solo - pretty much anything goes, but in team flying - every one must play together!

Thanks Wayne, most of my time right now is solo. So I just play with different settings and different places. Sort of testing the limits , so to say.
I have noticed the control with lines set on the furthest knot out. Hovers and side slipping and even reverse is much easier. And I think you said it would seem counterintuitive. So far both the mid vent and full sail like those settings.


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Joe - yes it works even though you think it shouldn't. And the more you get used to that feeling, you will learn to get enough speed from things. Even my play time is usually centered around thoughts of team flying. Practicing moves that help me learn and hone my team skills. 

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On February 5, 2017 at 9:16 PM, Wayne Dowler said:
Joe - yes it works even though you think it shouldn't. And the more you get used to that feeling, you will learn to get enough speed from things. Even my play time is usually centered around thoughts of team flying. Practicing moves that help me learn and hone my team skills. 


And even better news to me, just the actions and movement have made my problem hand much better. Now I don't drop my handle near as often. Big ,huge for me. I do think that the padding might help more if moved almost to the top. But till then i flew for over an hour yesterday with the knots all the way out

IMG_0791.JPG

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I do not allow lessons taught in forward flight for new people.  Why bother, every kite goes forward.  The quads are about "control", you must first learn to back the kite up from inverted on the ground, or at the very least "cartwheel" it over to upright again!

The are a couple of ways to slow down a kite, but the best way to "control" a kite is thru a big dose of DOWN in the tuning.  All the cool tricks and extraordinary team stuff comes from controlled pilot commands to the bottom lines.  Oh sure you manipulate your thumbs, but the effect is brake, adding or lessening impact on the flight dynamics.

And for everyone laughing at the new Rev Classic (B-series sail & Reflex mechanism combined into one kite), get over it, it is for real and you will own and love one eventually too.  A huge wind range that starts with negative numbers!  It flies like a dialed in SUL and can work in a team environment when others are on mid-vents.  The most significant difference between the original reflex model and this current configuration is that lack of pronounced oversteer.  All powered up has a new meaning

The line thru the handles on the Reflex grips must be much more securely fastened down, before it is the equal of "no-snags".  Wiggling bits and sloppy commands dilute the fun.  Maybe yours came different than my, by mine needed some effort to raise their standards.  I used two lines, affixed to each other in opposite directions so they pull each other tighter not alternating 'tween loose and tight with every thumb flick

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On February 6, 2017 at 5:20 AM, Paul LaMasters said:
I do not allow lessons taught in forward flight for new people.  Why bother, every kite goes forward.  The quads are about "control", you must first learn to back the kite up from inverted on the ground, or at the very least "cartwheel" it over to upright again!
The are a couple of ways to slow down a kite, but the best way to "control" a kite is thru a big dose of DOWN in the tuning.  All the cool tricks and extraordinary team stuff comes from controlled pilot commands to the bottom lines.  Oh sure you manipulate your thumbs, but the effect is brake, adding or lessening impact on the flight dynamics.
And for everyone laughing at the new Rev Classic (B-series sail & Reflex mechanism combined into one kite), get over it, it is for real and you will own and love one eventually too.  A huge wind range that starts with negative numbers!  It flies like a dialed in SUL and can work in a team environment when others are on mid-vents.  The most significant difference between the original reflex model and this current configuration is that lack of pronounced oversteer.  All powered up has a new meaning
The line thru the handles on the Reflex grips must be much more securely fastened down, before it is the equal of "no-snags".  Wiggling bits and sloppy commands dilute the fun.  Maybe yours came different than my, by mine needed some effort to raise their standards.  I used two lines, affixed to each other in opposite directions so they pull each other tighter not alternating 'tween loose and tight with every thumb flick


Maybe some can relate it's much like cutting brakes, or a skid steer vehicle
And you're right, I found I needed a little more brake input for a stall or hover. With that adjusting the bottom leader in seems to help precision. Is that the general rule?



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13 hours ago, jmaldo100 said:

Hello i met jinx today she took a picture of us together. Question when you buy the handle leaders from JB do they come in a pair top and bottom left and right.


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Like Wayne said -- yes.

I saw the picture of you and Jynx, and now I can put a face with the name. I'm glad you could hook up with her and the others at TI, and I'll bet you picked up more info than you could process in just a couple of days. It'll come back to you when you need it.

Modify your handles as soon as possible; you won't regret it. The TK/JB leaders are really inexpensive for the amount of work that goes into tying them, but while you wait for yours if you're buying a set, you can remove the tops from your handles and untie them so they are not doubled over and therefore twice the length, and retie knots onto the now-single strand. Don't worry, the cord is strong enough to handle the pull. Just leave the bottoms the way they are. Technically, you only need one knot on the bottom; all adjustments can be made using only the tops.

Welcome to the family.

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Some of us adjust at the top, some the bottom - both can get the same results. Pulling in a top is like lengthening a bottom and vice versa. I adjust from the top, easier for me to keep track. I only use the bottom knots to equalize lines on the fly, then sort out later. Some go the other way round, still does the same thing. For me - needing to change bottom settings = next kite!

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1 hour ago, Joe Eyman said:


Maybe some can relate it's much like cutting brakes, or a skid steer vehicle
And you're right, I found I needed a little more brake input for a stall or hover. With that adjusting the bottom leader in seems to help precision. Is that the general rule?
 

Bringing the bottom lines in has the same effect as letting the tops out. One in on the bottom plus one out on top is the same as two out on the top or two in on the bottom.  Technically, you only need one knot on the bottom; all adjustments can be made using only the tops, and is recommended to keep the kite safely "parked" in the inverted position on the ground while you make adjustments. You will understand why when, not if, the kite takes off unexpectedly.

Imagine each handle as a straight stick. By moving the knots in or out on the top and/or the bottom is changing the angle of the sticks from this   /   to this   l   to this   \   when you look at it from the flyer's left side. Of course, when you are flying you are constantly changing that angle, but the point at which the lines are initially set determines the ease with which you can do it, and the range of motion it makes possible.

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6 hours ago, Joe Eyman said:


And even better news to me, just the actions and movement have made my problem hand much better. Now I don't drop my handle near as often. Big ,huge for me. I do think that the padding might help more if moved almost to the top. But till then i flew for over an hour yesterday with the knots all the way outIMG_0791.thumb.JPG.acbaae07f582f929537ff


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I see from the photo that you hold the handles way up high. I understand that you do that to maintain a better grip on the one that gets away from you occasionally. However, this puts your hands too high and limits the amount of brake control available on the average, limits one end of the range of motion that would make inputs more effective, and actually makes the handles harder to hold onto when the kite is in an inverted hover because you are giving the leverage advantage to the kite. Ideally, your middle finger should rest on the balance point of each handle, the spot that when supported by only one finger keeps the kite stationary and not moving forward or backward. 

Not criticizing your technique or style, just trying to help with hanging on to the handle. I have old arthritic hands and can sympathize. I have found through my experience that the relatively large diameter of the foam grips that are normally found on the handles makes my hands tired and achy after a couple of hours, and yes, I have dropped a handle several times. The standard foam used is 1-1/8" diameter or 1-1/16" diameter. I found that it's easier for me to hold on to if they are 3/4" to 1" in diameter. You might try experimenting with smaller diameter grips to see if it helps, or possibly making it oval in cross-section. 

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I see from the photo that you hold the handles way up high. I understand that you do that to maintain a better grip on the one that gets away from you occasionally. However, this puts your hands too high and limits the amount of brake control available on the average, limits one end of the range of motion that would make inputs more effective, and actually makes the handles harder to hold onto when the kite is in an inverted hover because you are giving the leverage advantage to the kite. Ideally, your middle finger should rest on the balance point of each handle, the spot that when supported by only one finger keeps the kite stationary and not moving forward or backward. 
Not criticizing your technique or style, just trying to help with hanging on to the handle. I have old arthritic hands and can sympathize. I have found through my experience that the relatively large diameter of the foam grips that are normally found on the handles makes my hands tired and achy after a couple of hours, and yes, I have dropped a handle several times. The standard foam used is 1-1/8" diameter or 1-1/16" diameter. I found that it's easier for me to hold on to if they are 3/4" to 1" in diameter. You might try experimenting with smaller diameter grips to see if it helps, or possibly making it oval in cross-section. 

Will try moving down to the handles, this is how I was shown. Thwarted by soccer players yesterday.....


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Let me insert my thoughts here:

Try lowering your hands to at least only your index finger is off the foam. Ideally, your whole hand should be, that is why the foam is there! Otherwise - why bother? My snagless were setup to stay all the way down on the foam, I only go higher if absolutely needed!

Thought on thickness of foams - I too am older and losing some dexterity, but use the foam size to my advantage! I just crook my fingers and let the handle rest in that crook space. I really don't need to "hold on" that way. Paul L. has a great way of putting it - you are holding a baby bird, not strangling a snake! Way too often I see folks with a death grip on the handles - no way to get any fluidity out of that position. Arms are all tensed, shoulders and neck too. It's supposed to be relaxing!!! This ergonomic works for me, not sure of your situation, but I encourage you to try it out!

PS: flying indoors, we have a saying - if you aren't dropping a handle once in a while, you are probably holding them too tight!!

Relax - Breathe!!!!

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