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TonyK

Beach flying advice

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I recently retired and am planning on spending time flying a kite on the beach in front of my condo in Mexico.
 
I probably have about 70 feet from the Waters edge to objects on the beach. During low tide, the water pulls out about another 100 feet.
 
I'm ordering a revolution EXP that comes with 65 foot lines. I'm planning on getting spare lines in case mine break. Should I get longer lines and cut them (no idea if it is hard to tie all the Knots and get things "right") or should I buy a set that is already the right length?
 
If I get 30 foot lines, will that make it harder for me to learn how to fly my kite?
 
How much room do you actually need to fly one of these kites? When I watch videos, people seem to move around a bit and land frequently so I'm thinking I need to have a fair bit more open space than my line length.
 
Sorry for the noob questions.
 
I'm trying to make sure I buy the right things before I head down to Mexico so I don't have to deal with shipping to Mexico.
 
Sent from my [device_name] using http://KiteLife mobile app
 
 


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I have flown Revs on lines from eight feet to two hundred and fifty feet long. The shorter the lines, the faster the kite moves, and the perimeter of the wind window decreases. You have less time to react to the kite's movement and this makes it harder to learn. The advice most experienced pilots give to folks just starting out is to use 80ft or longer lines. You can do it with 65's, it's not impossible, but it will be more difficult and take longer unless you are a "natural". Some people pick it up in minutes. Some people will still be having a hard time after 10 hours on the lines. You will probably fall somewhere in between. I would recommend a 120ft set that you may fashion into two shorter sets eventually when they begin to wear. 120ft are the common length you will fly in a group should you get the chance at a fest. 120's also give you a huge area to fly across. I would recommend learning on 120's and timing your learning to when the tide is out. I know that's a pain in the ass and won't let you fly each time you get the urge, but you'll get more smiles per gallon when you're not fighting the kite.

Most beginners start backing up when trying to fly the kite, walking backwards until they run out of room. Don't. One step back when launching, then try to stay in the same spot or even move forward a few steps when the kite is pulling well, so if you do need to add some oomph if the wind slows down you have the room to do it. Don't fly in the upper or lower recommended wind range stated for the kite. Stay about five mph away from the extremes until you have mastered basic control of the kite. It will only frustrate the crap out of you if you try. The techniques you will need for those conditions will come to you with time. It may take as much as 80 hours to get the hang of it. Remember, you're doing this to have fun. Don't make it like work.

You will have some frustrating situations arise if you will be learning on your own without an experienced flyer by your side telling you what not to do, so check out the beginner tutorials available on this forum and watch each one several times until you nearly have it memorized. Then watch them a few more times -- seriously. Pay very close attention to everything John says in them. He does not give you any info you won't need. If you do it exactly the way he describes it, you will have zero problems, especially the videos on setup and breakdown and handling the lines at those times. Treat what he tells you in the tutorials as GOSPEL and you'll do well. These are proven methods that will not let you down. Once you have established a routine way of doing things you will begin to develop your own "style". Until then stick with what is guaranteed to work. And just so you know you're not alone, at least 95% of all quad flyers have tangled their lines, horribly. Frustrating as hell -- oh yeah! Sit down, untangle them, get over it. __it happens.

If it feels like the kite is out of your control most of the time and you'll probably break it. You may consider taking a couple of spare frame pieces with you just in case. You will use them if you fly fairly often. They do wear out eventually. Buy no-snag handles if you can get them at the same time as the kite, and extended leaders for them. If you end up with the hog ring style handles, we'll tell you how to modify them to make them snagless. Definitely get or make extended leaders for the handles. If you don't, you'll never have your kite adjusted well for conditions.

I'm sure others will chime in to give you some insight into their experience with quad kites, so stay tuned. If you have questions, ask. We'll give options you may not have considered, and tell you what will only cause frustration even though it may seem like the logical solution.

If you're going to do it on your own once you get there, stay in touch so we can give you a hand with it.

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Great advice up above.  I did not do hardly any of the correct things starting out.  I survived it all & had a great time in the process.  I eventually achieved a fairly decent flying ability despite my worst efforts.  I did really excel in acquiring kites, but that's another story.

SHBKF

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You don't need a second set straight away. You will want one but not really needed to start with. 65 feet is fine to start on. Not too fast (30's) and not too big to take up a large amount of real-estate (120's).

Use a stake to set up and break down. Set up with the Leading Edge down. Follow JB's line management tutorial to the "tee" and you'll be fine. This will all make more sense once you have the kite.

Does the package come with a DVD? Worth watching but certain things are a little differently done.

One tip. If flying straight into the ground "thumbs forward, extend your arms and take a step forward". This takes the drive out of the kite and you won't crash as hard. They can take quite a beating and still be good. First crash will be a shock but they get less and less. Also won't worry you as much after the first one....

Sent from a Galaxy 8 Far Far Down Under.

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if lines are 65' and you have 70' of beach will be close then fine if the wind is blowing from the ocean. if is from the land to ocean will be some problems with a wet kite especial because i understand you are a beginner.

that is one,second EXP is rated 4 to 15 mph winds and from mi experience in Mexico shores wind most of the time exceeds 15. especially if you are a beginner will be problems in control from higher then 10 mph because of the speed and kite puling. This will make the learning curve how  Makatakam said ( he give me the first inside on quads) extremely frustrating. will be a good idea depending the media of the winds in the area to order a went or a full vent. if you placed the order already and you are not willing a second vent kite, if the winds are how i know buy a set of 4 wraps frame and exchange the frame of EXP with in higher then 10 mph. that will give an extra strength to the frame but speed and puling will not be solved and chances to break something on crashes are high till you will have a decent control.

now about the space you need. If the lines are 65' you need for safety 131' on to a 160 degrees radius on direction of the wind.Kite is making damage if you hit something or somebody and lines are burning or cutting very bad in flesh.

all the best and let us know about your journey in "dark world"  

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OK, lots here:

65' is OK. The kite actually doesn't fly faster, just runs out of "window" faster. The shorter the faster that "window" gets used up. Having a set of 120's is a good choice for extras. And yes, as they wear, you can cut them down.

The frame is marked EXP, but is actually a 3 wrap. Kinda the middle of the road frame. If you need more info on frames - ask. Just know that all 1.5 frames will interchange in any 1.5 sail. And there are lots!

Learn what the wind window represents. That dictates the room needed to fly SAFELY! Never over anyone! Find a safe spot. Usually that window is a half circle (180*) with the wind to your back. That is a little big, but establish your safe zone based on that.

Get a stake! Helps with unwinding lines, rest times, rewinding. Also works to check the lines for equalizing - See JB's tutorials!! 

ALWAYS park your kite upside down!!! If upwards, anyone walking through, will snag a line and the kite can launch. Upside down, the kite is trying to fly alright - straight into the ground! More safety!!!

Throw out all the recommended wind ranges and rely on your feel! If you think the wind is too strong - it probably is! I would really ask you to think of adding a vented sail to your collection. Many used are out there, it doesn't have to be new. But it will make flying in strong winds much more enjoyable, than trying to control a full sail. Usually a full sail (your EXP) and something vented, cover most conditions!

Spot on with the handles - get or make long leaders JB sells them here pre-tied or you can make your own. Just make sure that you make your knots as evenly spaced as you can and both leaders as identical as possible. JB's wife, TK, uses a jig, that's why theirs are so accurate! Strongly consider! 

Whew - I'm done!

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I have flown Revs on lines from eight feet to two hundred and fifty feet long. The shorter the lines, the faster the kite moves, and the perimeter of the wind window decreases. You have less time to react to the kite's movement and this makes it harder to learn. The advice most experienced pilots give to folks just starting out is to use 80ft or longer lines. You can do it with 65's, it's not impossible, but it will be more difficult and take longer unless you are a "natural". Some people pick it up in minutes. Some people will still be having a hard time after 10 hours on the lines. You will probably fall somewhere in between. I would recommend a 120ft set that you may fashion into two shorter sets eventually when they begin to wear. 120ft are the common length you will fly in a group should you get the chance at a fest. 120's also give you a huge area to fly across. I would recommend learning on 120's and timing your learning to when the tide is out. I know that's a pain in the ass and won't let you fly each time you get the urge, but you'll get more smiles per gallon when you're not fighting the kite.
Most beginners start backing up when trying to fly the kite, walking backwards until they run out of room. Don't. One step back when launching, then try to stay in the same spot or even move forward a few steps when the kite is pulling well, so if you do need to add some oomph if the wind slows down you have the room to do it. Don't fly in the upper or lower recommended wind range stated for the kite. Stay about five mph away from the extremes until you have mastered basic control of the kite. It will only frustrate the crap out of you if you try. The techniques you will need for those conditions will come to you with time. It may take as much as 80 hours to get the hang of it. Remember, you're doing this to have fun. Don't make it like work.
You will have some frustrating situations arise if you will be learning on your own without an experienced flyer by your side telling you what not to do, so check out the beginner tutorials available on this forum and watch each one several times until you nearly have it memorized. Then watch them a few more times -- seriously. Pay very close attention to everything John says in them. He does not give you any info you won't need. If you do it exactly the way he describes it, you will have zero problems, especially the videos on setup and breakdown and handling the lines at those times. Treat what he tells you in the tutorials as GOSPEL and you'll do well. These are proven methods that will not let you down. Once you have established a routine way of doing things you will begin to develop your own "style". Until then stick with what is guaranteed to work. And just so you know you're not alone, at least 95% of all quad flyers have tangled their lines, horribly. Frustrating as hell -- oh yeah! Sit down, untangle them, get over it. __it happens.
If it feels like the kite is out of your control most of the time and you'll probably break it. You may consider taking a couple of spare frame pieces with you just in case. You will use them if you fly fairly often. They do wear out eventually. Buy no-snag handles if you can get them at the same time as the kite, and extended leaders for them. If you end up with the hog ring style handles, we'll tell you how to modify them to make them snagless. Definitely get or make extended leaders for the handles. If you don't, you'll never have your kite adjusted well for conditions.
I'm sure others will chime in to give you some insight into their experience with quad kites, so stay tuned. If you have questions, ask. We'll give options you may not have considered, and tell you what will only cause frustration even though it may seem like the logical solution.
If you're going to do it on your own once you get there, stay in touch so we can give you a hand with it.
Thanks for the reply. I just ordered my kite. Apparently, it will be one of the new sail patterns for the exp. I ended up getting an extra set of 80ft lines and a bunch of spare parts so that I'm not dead in the water if something breaks. Shipping to Mexico is sketchy sometimes so I'm trying to be self sufficient.

Can't wait to get my new toy! Off to watch videos now so that I don't totally destroy it on my maiden flight.

Sent from my ONEPLUS 3 using KiteLife mobile app

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You don't need a second set straight away. You will want one but not really needed to start with. 65 feet is fine to start on. Not too fast (30's) and not too big to take up a large amount of real-estate (120's).

Use a stake to set up and break down. Set up with the Leading Edge down. Follow JB's line management tutorial to the "tee" and you'll be fine. This will all make more sense once you have the kite.

Does the package come with a DVD? Worth watching but certain things are a little differently done.

One tip. If flying straight into the ground "thumbs forward, extend your arms and take a step forward". This takes the drive out of the kite and you won't crash as hard. They can take quite a beating and still be good. First crash will be a shock but they get less and less. Also won't worry you as much after the first one....

Sent from a Galaxy 8 Far Far Down Under.


Thanks. I ordered a kite stake and hopefully it will work ok in the sand. Our beach has fairly fine sand so it should be ok.

I will try to remember to thrust my thumbs forward if a crash is imminent. Appreciate the tip.

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OK, lots here:
65' is OK. The kite actually doesn't fly faster, just runs out of "window" faster. The shorter the faster that "window" gets used up. Having a set of 120's is a good choice for extras. And yes, as they wear, you can cut them down.
The frame is marked EXP, but is actually a 3 wrap. Kinda the middle of the road frame. If you need more info on frames - ask. Just know that all 1.5 frames will interchange in any 1.5 sail. And there are lots!
Learn what the wind window represents. That dictates the room needed to fly SAFELY! Never over anyone! Find a safe spot. Usually that window is a half circle (180*) with the wind to your back. That is a little big, but establish your safe zone based on that.
Get a stake! Helps with unwinding lines, rest times, rewinding. Also works to check the lines for equalizing - See JB's tutorials!! 
ALWAYS park your kite upside down!!! If upwards, anyone walking through, will snag a line and the kite can launch. Upside down, the kite is trying to fly alright - straight into the ground! More safety!!!
Throw out all the recommended wind ranges and rely on your feel! If you think the wind is too strong - it probably is! I would really ask you to think of adding a vented sail to your collection. Many used are out there, it doesn't have to be new. But it will make flying in strong winds much more enjoyable, than trying to control a full sail. Usually a full sail (your EXP) and something vented, cover most conditions!
Spot on with the handles - get or make long leaders JB sells them here pre-tied or you can make your own. Just make sure that you make your knots as evenly spaced as you can and both leaders as identical as possible. JB's wife, TK, uses a jig, that's why theirs are so accurate! Strongly consider! 
Whew - I'm done!
I suspect I may get a fully vented kite at some point as it can sometimes get windy. Not sure if it will be another Rev or one of those freilein kites. Will have to do some research if I find the wind is regularly too strong.

Sent from my ONEPLUS 3 using KiteLife mobile app

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Sounds like you have things in control. Do watch the videos many times. Do get the extended leaders, or modify the tops that come with the handles to be at least twice as long. Longer leaders are a MUST if you expect to do any better than "flogging".

If you find anything baffling in the least bit, ask about it. The solution may not be logical. The upright spars go in back. Some beginners make the mistake of putting them in front which makes the kite difficult for a pro to fly. Of course, you'll see the proper assembly of the kite when you watch the videos. 

Stay in touch.

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That’s funny first couple times I flew my first quad I had the spars on the front side of the kite. Some stranger came along and corrected my mistake and gave me some pointers. Sure helped a lot. Good luck.


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It is hard NOT correcting people when their set-up or tuning, even their assembly efforts could be improved upon.  I want to just start changing things and then demand they fly inverted immediately too.  See the sooner you get comfortable an inch above the ground (inverted) the sooner you'll own your hover.  I see folks with tangled bridles or not install consistently side to side.

I watch people attach their lines to the kite and then unroll 'em away.  I never do that, I unroll from a single stake, separating the lines, determine which ones are tops and bottoms and THEN affix the kite when it's all laid out perfectly. That way nothing gets tangled. like if it's rainy, windy, wet sloppy mud and and/or a sand environment.  How many times have I helped master-class fliers untangle their lines?  My God what is with you folks?  Learn a system that works in ALL conditions and stick with it.  If your system is so good now then how come you need me to help you?

I watch folks approach the kite on the ground and they are dragging' the handles along with them!  NEVER do that, roll them lines up correctly or drag the stinking handles behind the kite (NOT on/thru sand though!) until you get to your new position.

We see lots of folks visiting from around the world, down on the Washington Mall flying Occasionally they are flying quads, half of 'em have equal length leaders top & bottom and can't fly backwards.

All the micro-control and cool tricks are hiding behind a big dose of "down" in the tuning.  Filling the sail with pressure is the ticket 5 months out of the year in the mid-atlantic states.  You have an unlimited ceiling with indoor conditions!  You can't tune in forward drive, you're just dumping the pressure off of that angled sail,... no you need a big dose of "down" (reverse) in the tuning,..... then you have to MAKE it fly using your feet.

I have actually angered dear friends by fiddling with their kite's bridle installation, or adjusting the tuning of handles.  Eventually with more experience though, they want to pay me to modify all of their kites so they "feel" like mine do in flight.

I need much more restraint until folks actually request my involvement, ... it's an ongoing struggle for me personally.  "You're not doing it wrong, but you could do it so much better, HA!"

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TonyK

 

If you want a visual example of what NOT to do on your first few flights you should checkout my video on YouTube aptly titled

“Worst Rev Flight Ever - Day 2”

Keep in mind that I did not seek out any help at all before I dove into this. I bought a EXP at the beach and went for it. So already, compared to me, you’re way ahead of the game. I just watched the video again for the first time in a while and here are a few things that pop out.

 

THE KITE vs WIND CONDITIONS

I had 15-20 mph winds for my first outings with the EXP. It was a bit of a struggle as can be seen in the video. A vented kite would made this a little easier.

 

SETUP- Notice the leading edge is facing up. I had no idea but for safety reasons setup with leading edge in the sand. I used spars for stakes cuz it’s all I had. Tangled lines? Oh yeah that’s gonna happen just be very patient.

 

STANCE - Wow am I stiff or what???

I know the wind was strong but for crying out loud man, relax. My legs are all over the place and my arms are flailing as if I was directing a plane onto the tarmac. Keep arm movement to a minimum, try to keep elbows in close to your body and concentrate on wrist movements, that’s what really guides the kite. If you checkout my video titled “rev flight fail with lucky recovery” you’ll clearly see that my arm movements do NOTHING to prevent the kite from going into the water.

No need to white knuckle the handles. Relax your hands and try to control the handles with the tip of your fingers.

I had so much fun that first week I spent hours on that beach. That’s the key really just have fun. I didn’t know I was doing anything wrong until I met some locals who had a few ( a lot ) of pointers to help me make things much easier to learn.

If possible, before you head to Mexico get together with some local flyers and have them help you out, this will chop off many hours from your learning curve.

Have fun and remember The one thing that the video doesn’t show is the huge smile on my face.

 

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

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Feel free to read through my journey getting into revs in the other thread if you're bored, lots of tips and common questions answered by veterans here :)

My tip, since it's about flying on the beach in soft sand, find a long, extra long stake. I learnt it the hard way when I took my Rev to the beach for the very first time. I was using a regular screwdriver as a stake, standard size/length driver from Home Depot/Target. Too short, got buried in the sand and I ended up having to bury the kite handles itself so that it was strong enough to not get tugged out by the strength of the wind on the kite end.

I now use an extra-long driver :)

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my first Rev was a Backtracker and i used to wait for high winds and then try to fly between two buildings (so it would "focus" the wind more effectively on the sail).  I'd spend five seconds flying and 45 minutes untangling.  I had that darn thing for two years before I knew they could even be adjusted!

Watched Franck's video just now and wondered how he could fly at all with leaders the same lengths on the top & bottom.

It all comes with unconscious thought now, but I used to struggle mightily particularly in no/low wind.

My tip is to go to a coach if there's one nearby, it will save you thousands of dollars in time and funds.

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my first Rev was a Backtracker and i used to wait for high winds and then try to fly between two buildings (so it would "focus" the wind more effectively on the sail).  I'd spend five seconds flying and 45 minutes untangling.  I had that darn thing for two years before I knew they could even be adjusted!
Watched Franck's video just now and wondered how he could fly at all with leaders the same lengths on the top & bottom.
It all comes with unconscious thought now, but I used to struggle mightily particularly in no/low wind.
My tip is to go to a coach if there's one nearby, it will save you thousands of dollars in time and funds.
Sadly, I can't find any other Rev owners anywhere near me. 13 hour drive to Alberta where they have some is closest without having to go across the border into USA. In Mexico, I can't find anyone, never mind nearby. I figure I'm learning by watching videos and flying solo. My kite should be here end of next week!

Sent from my ONEPLUS 3 using KiteLife mobile app

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I go across the country to fly with friends, see if you can do the same some time.  I placed funds for a condo necessary in august of 2019 this past week, just as an example.

I want to be part of the 100 person meg-fly at WSIKF!

Gott'a make sacrifices if you want to get strong

I learned alone, not my recommended path for you though, saves tons of time and funds by joining others.  I easily spend ten times the amount of money on travel as opposed to actually buying kites themselves.

21 years my bride and I have been on the road (for festivals), it's still fun and she doesn't even like the sport kite aspects of a fest.

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I agree with advice given, especially looking to find time with other pilots as often as reasonable. Hey you could always ask a friend to help you by holding a cell phone for a Waze video call from Mexico if you need help. There is always a work around if needed and an experienced pilot could look at what you are doing and give pointers that help you step forward faster in your skills.

That said what I would add is this- if you don't Ave a lot of real estate to work with then I suggest markibg in the sand your limits. A "if I cross this line I will hit the _____", or "If people walking towards me pass the bag I left at the kite end of my lines I will know they are in my danger zone. It can be hard to judge distance with the kites, and other people are oblivious and or rightfully don't have any idea what our kites can do, so they can get into the flight area easily and keeping them safe is your job. For months I landed whenever anyone was in my danger zone.

Also, semetry is important, check your kite setup and your hand position. Focus hard at the start on equal and symmetrical hand placement and movements. We naturally tend to favor or over power one side and knowing and correcting for that is key. Start with focusing on launches that go straight up to the top of the window and come straight back down. If your launch always arches in one direction you are not being symmetrical and even. Getting good at this is ALL ABOUT building good and consistent muscle memory, which is all about consistentancy and repetition. Check your hand position frequently and keep your hands relaxed in front of your center of gravity. No wind in the arm pits man.

Lastly, keep breathing. Don't hold your breath, that loads tension into your body that you don't need. And imagine clearly what you want the kite to do- "Use the force Luke!". Thinking about what I want it to do and not about the mechanics of my movements helps to keep me from overthinking.

If you ever need help I am just a Waze video call away. :)

Sent from my [device_name] using http://KiteLife mobile app

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On 4/19/2018 at 9:39 AM, TonyK said:

Sadly, I can't find any other Rev owners anywhere near me. 13 hour drive to Alberta where they have some is closest without having to go across the border into USA. In Mexico, I can't find anyone, never mind nearby. I figure I'm learning by watching videos and flying solo. My kite should be here end of next week!

I'm in the Chicago area. I'll be happy to teach you in person. Room and board from December 1st through April 1st and I will be your personal instructor, and you'll be flying better than you thought you would in just a few short months.

:DYou are somewhere warm in Mexico, right?:lol:

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I agree with advice given, especially looking to find time with other pilots as often as reasonable. Hey you could always ask a friend to help you by holding a cell phone for a Waze video call from Mexico if you need help. There is always a work around if needed and an experienced pilot could look at what you are doing and give pointers that help you step forward faster in your skills.

That said what I would add is this- if you don't Ave a lot of real estate to work with then I suggest markibg in the sand your limits. A "if I cross this line I will hit the _____", or "If people walking towards me pass the bag I left at the kite end of my lines I will know they are in my danger zone. It can be hard to judge distance with the kites, and other people are oblivious and or rightfully don't have any idea what our kites can do, so they can get into the flight area easily and keeping them safe is your job. For months I landed whenever anyone was in my danger zone.

Also, semetry is important, check your kite setup and your hand position. Focus hard at the start on equal and symmetrical hand placement and movements. We naturally tend to favor or over power one side and knowing and correcting for that is key. Start with focusing on launches that go straight up to the top of the window and come straight back down. If your launch always arches in one direction you are not being symmetrical and even. Getting good at this is ALL ABOUT building good and consistent muscle memory, which is all about consistentancy and repetition. Check your hand position frequently and keep your hands relaxed in front of your center of gravity. No wind in the arm pits man.

Lastly, keep breathing. Don't hold your breath, that loads tension into your body that you don't need. And imagine clearly what you want the kite to do- "Use the force Luke!". Thinking about what I want it to do and not about the mechanics of my movements helps to keep me from overthinking.

If you ever need help I am just a Waze video call away. default_smile.png

Sent from my [device_name] using http://KiteLife mobile app


Thanks for the tips. I get my kite Friday or Monday depending on how Canada Post feels. I will practice control and basic maneuvering to start out.

Sent from my ONEPLUS 3 using KiteLife mobile app

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I'm in the Chicago area. I'll be happy to teach you in person. Room and board from December 1st through April 1st and I will be your personal instructor, and you'll be flying better than you thought you would in just a few short months.
You are somewhere warm in Mexico, right?
Right on the ocean, just North of Puerto Vallarta!

Sent from my ONEPLUS 3 using KiteLife mobile app

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If you're not careful that sand will get right between your toes. Play hard. Have fun. There will be a quiz.

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Got my new EXP and took it for it's maiden flight today. Even after watching the tutorial videos and line management videos, it was a tough slog. At first, my kite would just keep arcing to the left and crash. I fiddled with the bridle and the end caps until it would list of straight up. There must have been a line wrap somewhere.

At one point the kite landed in such a way that I could not get it to launch and I made the mistake of walking to it with the handles on my hand instead of staking them. The wind gusted and I found myself and my kite wrapped up in a ball of string. Took ten minutes to increase that mess.

Finally got it flying a bit but tended to either over steer or under steer and crashed more than I would like to admit. Often, I found that I would move the handle but the kite was slow to respond. In those situations, i think I may have to yank a bit too to get more wind in the sail when gusts die down.

Looking forward to trying again.IMG_20180427_110307.jpg

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Got my new EXP and took it for it's maiden flight today. Even after watching the tutorial videos and line management videos, it was a tough slog. At first, my kite would just keep arcing to the left and crash. I fiddled with the bridle and the end caps until it would lift off straight up. There must have been a line wrap somewhere.

At one point the kite landed in such a way that I could not get it to launch and I made the mistake of walking to it with the handles on my hand instead of staking them. The wind gusted and I found myself and my kite wrapped up in a ball of string. Took ten minutes to untangle that mess.

Finally got it flying a bit but tended to either over steer or under steer and crashed more than I would like to admit. Often, I found that I would move the handle but the kite was slow to respond. In those situations, i think I may have to yank a bit too to get more wind in the sail when gusts die down.

Looking forward to trying again.IMG_20180427_110307.jpg

Sent from my ONEPLUS 3 using KiteLife mobile app

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