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K'Tesh

D'OH!!!! 225Lb Kevlar line, and a small problem w/it

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Ok...  I finally have enough money to spare to score some serious kite related bling here in China (my first job in China was a real (not reel) dud (I'm being polite here... just in case kiddies are are around).

My new job has been paying well.  However, I had a few setbacks (e.g. needing a new computer was a real kick in the teeth, I've also been trying to save money for an upcoming trip back to the US (and being able to buy clothing that fits me)(China is not the place to try and buy clothing if you're big and/or tall)).  Finally, I'm within reach of my travel budget goal, so I can splurge a little.

Surprisingly, Kevlar kite line is sold with pound test (and not kilogram test) measurements.  I scored 1000 meters (yes... 1 Kilometer) of 225Lb test line (252 RMB/$39 USD).  I've got a new 30 Cm OD stainless steel kite reel (150RMB/$23 USD).  So, I spent several minutes today unreeling the 500 meters of 600Lb Kevlar line (bought by mistake w/way too heavy a line (I was thinking Kg, not Lbs)) and then wound the new line onto the reel.  

D'OH!!!  The line is too long for the reel.  It's threatening (more like blackmailing) to fall off the reel.  Now it looks like I need to get a 36 Cm OD stainless steel kite reel (243 RMB/$37 USD).  Nice thing is though, looks like you can buy replacement reels for those and swap them out when you want to use different test lines.  Of course, the line went on kinda loose, so if it was under tension, it may have stayed on nicely.  But of course, there's no wind at all, so I'd have to come up with another idea on how to do that.

[EDIT] I've wrapped .25" (or metric equivalent) elastic around the spool to keep the line from falling off.  It'll work for the short term, but I need a long term solution.[/EDIT]

 

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Kevlar line is a big NO for any kite in US. IF you fly alone you are good how long are not other people around (even non flyers) . if you will rise two kites and the lines are coming on contact with each other there is a big chance to cut one of them. for sure some other flyers from this forum will take the time to write you the same thing. on this case i will tell you " what is in china stay in china "

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The simplest long term solution would be to not put so much line on the reel. How high do you fly your kites? Most of my winders have no more than 300 ft on them since I fly my kites at 150-200 ft. 

3 hours ago, Edmond Dragut said:

Kevlar line is a big NO for any kite in US. IF you fly alone you are good how long are not other people around (even non flyers) . if you will rise two kites and the lines are coming on contact with each other there is a big chance to cut one of them. for sure some other flyers from this forum will take the time to write you the same thing. on this case i will tell you " what is in china stay in china "

I fly my kites on Kevlar, and as long as I let people around me know that, I’ve never had a problem.

 

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I tend to fly at orbital distances.  If I have the line,  I will fly all of it whenever possible. 

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You can think whatever you want.

I know Kevlar is strong, and can cut other lines.  But I take every step I can to avoid contact with other kites.  I'm often flying during the weekdays at mid-day when other fliers are busy at work (I work evenings and weekends). 

The waterfront in Yantai often has strong winds blowing from the south (towards the sea).  Tall buildings face the ocean, and do a great job of messing up the winds around the waterfront.  If you want to fly, you have to get the kite out over the ocean, as far as possible from the buildings.  *If* there are other fliers out there, they are trying (in vain) to fly small, cheap, preprinted ripstop kites that are available for a few RMB. Kids might be able to get them up for a minute or two, but then the wind shifts, and the kites drop like bricks. Only serious kites (2 meters wide or larger) can get up in those tricky winds.  Those are few and far between. I'm often the only large kite up, or half a kilometer away from the nearest other flier (who's kite is also pointed out to sea).

The line that was sold with my kite snapped not long after buying it (though long enough not to be eligible for a refund/replacement).  I had to pay a few guys with a motor boat to go and catch the kite (it wasn't fluttering down after snapping, it had enough drag from the toys on the line to keep it airborne) before it had a chance to fly to Pyongyang, North Korea.  Doing that wasn't cheap, but less than replacing the kite, toys,  and lost line. After inspecting the line, and cutting away imperfect areas and splicing the remaining line together I put it back into the rotation.  I continued to use it until it failed again. The wind was from the west, not light, but certainly not heavy and the kite broke free again, and this time went down in a tree.  I got it back, but it was damaged (I've since bought a replacement, and this is what I'm flying currently).  There was no damage visible to the line that would have given me a warning that it was going to fail again.  I'm not going to risk any kite I value on that line.  From now on, I'll buy lines that I know the properties of.

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you are THE MAN. is an old saying " i can't argue with people without reason " and this is the decent version. i wish you all the best 

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