JaseRicco

Rev Exp w/ Reflex for Beginner?

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I currently have a dual line, Prism Quantum, which I enjoy flying very much. Thinking of picking up a used Rev Exp off the forum for my low wind days. Would this be a good beginner quad to learn on as I have never flown quad before? Are these kites really good for no/low wind?

Thank you in advance for any advice.

 

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The EXP is Rev's "intro" to quad and is generally a slightly heavier sail.. I'll be honest with you, for the same price as a new EXP you can get the Freilein Vertigo which is significantly lighter and has better low wind performance.. There's also the option for a older Rev B-Series used which I have a feeling will be much easier to find soon as there is a new quad on the horizon many of us are looking forward to.

If the EXP will meet your needs to learn on, then so be it but I have not found an experienced individual that considers them to be a low wind option. They are much more of a general baseline option.

The Lower wind options are Revolution Zen if you can find one, Rev Ghost, Rev Phantom, Several 1.5 SUL versions and the Freilein Vertigo.. For a bit more $$ the Phoenix Ashes (by Bazzer) is a great low wind sail.

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6 hours ago, riffclown said:

The EXP is Rev's "intro" to quad and is generally a slightly heavier sail.. I'll be honest with you, for the same price as a new EXP you can get the Freilein Vertigo which is significantly lighter and has better low wind performance.. There's also the option for a older Rev B-Series used which I have a feeling will be much easier to find soon as there is a new quad on the horizon many of us are looking forward to.

If the EXP will meet your needs to learn on, then so be it but I have not found an experienced individual that considers them to be a low wind option. They are much more of a general baseline option.

The Lower wind options are Revolution Zen if you can find one, Rev Ghost, Rev Phantom, Several 1.5 SUL versions and the Freilein Vertigo.. For a bit more $$ the Phoenix Ashes (by Bazzer) is a great low wind sail.

Thanks for the info. While perusing the “kites for sale” section, I see a few different variations of the 1.5; 1.5 Classic, 1.5 B Series(which you mentioned), 1.5 SUL, 1.5 SLE...differences? Is there one I should stick with as a beginner?

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IF you are looking for the very light wind performance then the Kite marked as  SUL would be your best choice. that being said, secondary market, it's really hard to beat a good B-series. I'd avoid the SLE which has a larger diameter leading edge. It is very stiff and avoided by most quad fliers. Those that do have th SLE's typically switch out the LE for a regular frame. The B-Series while not marketed as a beginner kite will do everything the others will do and still be there for you to grow into..

The VERY best advice you will get is to go fly with others and try their kites first..

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Go with the SUL for light wind and your area of the country in general. You will need to put in a couple dozen or more hours with the quad to learn control basics (about the same amount of time it took to learn basic control of the dual) before you start feeling comfy in very light wind. The weight of the SUL can be further reduced if you find the need to. However, make no modifications until you have at least 40 hours on the quad in very light wind. Light wind flying is itself an art that takes some time to master. Your inputs will need to be honed to a keener edge. If you intend to only fly it when you can't fly the Quantum, then you'll be ok. If you want to fly a quad in the same wind as your Quantum you will need one that is a step up from the SUL, or at least a heavier frame to use with the SUL sail.

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there are some great quad-heads in NJ, you are lucky to live there

you need to hook-up with Lisa Willoughby, or Dennis Smith for a personal lesson (Liberty State Park is a frequent destination)

There's a four decade level of experience available from this pairs team, Lisa is an excellent indoor pilot too and Smitty kicks my butt in competition MMB almost every time we meet (since 1999).

They are both master class dual line pilots besides the quads.  Lisa coordinates a festival on Long Beach Island (NJ) in the fall too.  You've gotta make a way there and time to join us.  night fly, buggies, huge inflatables, quad team, competition, but only the "fun events" <HA!> are held.  Naturally demos done all day.

A bunch of us are in the Washington DC area if you ever get down there.  In the summer-time it's a indoor quad-lined event with an unlimited ceiling almost every time we meet (5 months worth anyway).

A coach will save you both time and money, ignore the travel cost fears, you are SAVING big time with a coach and getting to experience a bunch of flight variations w/o any financial commitment.  

You get to "FEEL" it and see if you connect.  Quads are as a variable as any driven vehicles to take you across town, (you can make a quad any way you want with tuning, selections of framing and sail configurations, line choices and handles.) 

All smooth and graceful              or           twitchy and responsive?

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No kite is suitable for light winds - unless the flier's skills are up to it. It takes a lot to learn light wind flying and do it right. Skills - not equipment is the single most important thing needed. Too many have chased that demon and lost.

Does this mean that the proper equipment is useless - of course not! In both dual line and quads, there are models for light wind. Quads also offer you a variety of rods to choose from to meet your goals. But the finest equipment means  nothing if you don't know how to use it. All about skills ......

There are countless options on a good beginner quad. Most have already been posted here.Any good quad with maybe 2 frame choices, would be a very satisfactory starter kite.

Take the time to learn the basics in decent winds, then attempt light wind flying. No fun trying to learn control, when you are fighting to keep the sail aloft. Look for a 5-10 mph wind and get those basics down! 

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Wayne is right, frustration is kicking fast when you struggle to keep the kite flying in low winds. already sayed 5-10 mph is great for learning the basics. when you will stop crashing because of wind stop, sudden shifting or a wrong maneuver and most important to don't back up without to recover the lost space then you may start to think at  low winds and proper kite for 

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