Breezin

Nose Landing

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In one of the archived magazines(can't remember which one) at a competition in Hawaii the winds were blowing most everyone out of the sky. Fella flew nose down, landed, took off and never put the LE on the ground. Nose diving was the very first trick I learned after take off. Extremely easy to do.Learned that even before landing 🤪. Intentionally landing a duel on the nose in light winds seems so counter intuitive let alone 20 mph plus. Then the take off!!! I tried the trick again today in winds 5 and less on the Widow Maker ,Tekken SUL and Black Dog. Closest to success on the Black Dog. I can hit the landing and stay balanced 10% from the fade, unrolling or snap stall with a 1/2 turn. Coming straight down center window I think the only way to do it is just before the nose hits push with a slight flare. Do not have the nerve to try that yet. I can't take off without touching another part of the kite to the ground. The only small success is flipping the kite into a rising fade. My rising fades still need a lot of practice. None of the approaches I use are what was described in the article. Seems impossible. Yesterday in 20 to 25 mph it feels like the higher winds provide  the best chance for a take off. Balanced on the nose , pull the kite forward, push, pop but I drag the wing tip.Not enough elevation.Nose landings in those winds are beyond me for now. I'm thinking after the kites nose hit the ground maybe it bounced a bit. If that's the case then I should only try on my carbon tubed kites. Psycho, Black Dog and grand kids Addiction.Problem with that theory is I think it was done on a sandy beach.Watched some quad videos of kites coming full bore to a dead stop inches off the ground but can't connect that to a duel in my mind at all. Can't find a video of it being done. Don't even know what it's called. Does any one do this. Can any one explain how it's done?

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I am going out on a limb and say it might be similar to a pancake landing followed by a belly launch. But that does not answer the hover question.

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I can see that accept the only part of the kite that touches the ground is the nose.  I do think  the flare at the start of a Pancake is key.The launch really stumps me. Going to try spinning on the nose like doing a wingtip pirouette. Don't think that's it but maybe I'll get some insight.Pancake to belly launches are my favorite way to get air born. Tried a little bit on the Hydra yesterday. Can't balance on the nose very well with that kite. Could also be that the era in which the trick is described the kite had a straight nose instead of rounded. Tilting the kite onto the squared edge of the nose could give a kick to the launch. If I can get this I MIGHT be able to call myself a level 5 flier 😏.

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That was Scott Aughenbaugh. 

Video from another event, same move partway through...

 

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Angle of the leading edge is a strong influence on nose / leading edge launches like that...

Assuming the same height of kite:

Smaller wingspan (steeper) = easier

Wider wingspan (shallower) = harder

Not always, but generally.

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Kites of old tend to be closer to a 45 degree leading edge (LE) angle at the nose, modern era kites tend to be quite a bit wider than 45 which is good for slack line maneuvers.

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Awesome. This is going to take some practice. 0 to 3 the last few afternoons. Landed a few times with the PD but backed off for fear of breaking something. In 1 to 2 I can float the kite nose down fairly well. 2 to 3 feet off the ground I give a slight flare slow down while moving forward.  Kite drops like a stone. When I get this for the 1st time it'll probably be on the Black Dog in winds under 5. My other kites seem to come in to fast right now. For a trick seemingly so simple the finesse is pretty difficult. It looks like such an excellent punctuation mark to end a series of combos. Thanks a bunch for the info John.

 

\Thanks a bunch for the info John.

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Easier to learn Flic Flacs then this trick. Sooo after reading what JB replied I got this todayIMG_20180902_132617199 - Edited.jpg.No label so I don't know what it is. 4mm frame and spreaders.Connectors are kinda like a electrical wing nut shape. Notch at the bottom on either side where the lines slip into after larks head over the top.One piece  LS slides thru the stand offs and center tee. Spine is a little longer than the LE.Makes the kite tilt slightly to one side before launch. Left lower bridle connection was jacked. Probably why the kite is in  A shape. No wear on the nose. Bridle still had the marks so the retie was easy.Bridle to line set connection are metal rings. All 3 sail tension bungees need replaced. Jeez this stuff might be a sickness or something. Got this to learn ONE trick cause it ticks me off so bad  that I can't do it. Might take a bit but by golly :dual:.

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I assume it is the landing and takeoff by Mr Aughenbaugh beginning at about the 3:55 mark on the video that caught attention. I am not familiar with the move, but in addition to the kite comments (may be in part kite specific), I note three things:

1. See how Scott runs forward to decelerate the kite (and appears to throw his hands forward to accentuate that at the very end);

2. It is on sand - may be easier on the landing and 'slipperier' on the takeoff;

3. It is The Scott Aughenbaugh.

;)

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