coolkev99

Single or Dual line - all around kite? Newb here

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Hello KiteLife!     I have a week long vacation in Destin FL starting this coming weekend and I thought, maybe it would be fun to have a kite on the beach!    So I've been looking around and doing a little research, and the more I look, the more questions come to mind.   

Ok here's the skinny - I don't really see myself getting super-into this hobby (but I'm sure a lot of you thought that) so I don't think I am looking for a kite to "grow into".     I am looking for something relaxing and enjoyable to bring to the beach, yet a little optional fun learning a dual line kite appeals to me.   I checked wind conditions around Destin and they seem to average-peak around 8-9mph, which was lower than I expected.   Do any of you have any thoughts as to a beginner dual line kite that would fit the bill?   As in - is pretty tame/docile/easy to fly/good in low-ish winds...  yet more interesting than single line kite?   

I was initially going to get Prism's Zenith 5 single line kite, but after I started looking into Dual line I was thinking Nexus or Quantum - or the Beetle or Vision kite from another companies.   Uhg.   I guess what I am also wondering since I have no dual line experience is - do all dual line kites require constant attention to properly keep aloft, or can they be simply/easily 'hung' in the sky when desired(assuming steady wind) similar to single line deltas?   🙄

Thanks all for you help!
   

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3 hours ago, coolkev99 said:

[...]   

I was initially going to get Prism's Zenith 5 single line kite, but after I started looking into Dual line I was thinking Nexus or Quantum - or the Beetle or Vision kite from another companies.   Uhg.   I guess what I am also wondering since I have no dual line experience is - do all dual line kites require constant attention to properly keep aloft, or can they be simply/easily 'hung' in the sky when desired(assuming steady wind) similar to single line deltas?   🙄

Thanks all for you help!
   

Welcome to kites!

With the exception of special kite positions such as the turtle or fade (which normally require some tending and don’t generally last long) dual line kites always require constant attention, some more alert attention, others more relaxed, relatively. Often correlated to size (although not always).

(As a side note, Prism used to make a kite that could be flown in either single line or dual line mode -- the Switch. Don’t know if it ever took off (so to speak) in the market however and it has been discontinued.)

As far as good beginner dual line kites, of the ones you mention I know and like the Beetle but there may be more modern ones available that would fill the bill -- I am gonna defer to others here as I am a little out of touch and just getting back into kites again myself after a prolonged absence. The Quantum gets good reviews for being a well-built kite that is reportedly tough. It should be fine in the winds you mention and a lot more. It is a bigger kite so will probably provide good bang for the buck.  Speaking of which, it may come down to budget as always. Do consider used as a viable option…

Have fun at any rate!

.

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What are you planning to do as you fly?

Single line kites can be attached to an anchor and then mostly ignored. (That doesn't mean abandoned, they need to be supervised and occasionally adjusted if wind changes significantly.) Children like to run with smaller single line kites, but if you need to run or flail your arms that's usually a sign that something needs adjustment. Generally they're like a banner or pennant, put it up in the air and see it from afar; they're great for groups to mark where you are on the beach. If your goal is to sit on the beach, watch the waves, eat your picnic, and occasionally look up at the kite overhead, you want a single line kite. Large kites cost more money and also require better gear, such as sand anchors, and they're probably more money than you want to pay.  Generally the most difficult part is adjusting the kite for the wind, often there are some knots on the bridle that can be adjusted based on your wind speed, but once it is up you're basically done.

A multi-line kite (dual or quad) needs to be actively flown by a person. They are kites where the pilot must be in control at all times it is in the air. The only time you can eat your picnic lunch is when the kite is landed. It takes a little bit of skill, if someone helps you learn you can get the basics figured out in an hour or so, and enjoy flying as an activity. If you learn on your own it can take more time. With a bit of practice people can fly formations and patterns. With a bit more practice (more than one weekend) people can do mid-air tricks to make the kite flip, twirl, and otherwise behave in acrobatic ways.  People who are comfortable with it can fly for many hours in a day, but it is time on your feet with some upper-body exercise.

They're both good types of kites, but for different purposes. Many kite-laden beaches have both types of kites flying. Kite shows also tend to have a field of large single-line kites that are up from dawn to dusk, plus multi-line kites flown individually as long as the person wants.

 

 

If you decide on a dual line kite, of the ones you listed the Beetle has the best reputation for being nigh-indestructible. Parts can still break, but the kite is durable. There are many other kites, some are lighter, some designed for tricks, some designed for group flying, some designed to be a workout, some designed to drag you down a beach. Try to have someone teach you how to fly.  There are many varieties in the $50-$150 range.

If you decide on a single line kite, anything over about 8 feet is going to need a solid anchor. Smaller kites can often be tied to a table or heavy chair. The easiest indicator is the type of kite line. If you've got cheap cotton line it's a small kite, you do what you need get it in the air and tie it off. If it has a rating like 100lb line, 250lb line, 500lb line, you better arrange to have something to anchor it off with plus some training about kite safety. Having a line snap with a few hundred pounds on it can be dangerous, and launching/landing can sever fingers if done wrong.  Usually the small kites are cheap, you can find them in the store for a few dollars; the large kites quickly reach hundreds of dollars.

 

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And if you're interested in multi-line kites, don't be afraid about quad line kites. You can learn to fly dual-line kites or quad-line kites as a complete beginner, you don't need to master one before learning the other. Quad line kites tend to be more expensive, starting around $200 for a ready-to-fly package or a little less if used. They are also much easier to learn with a mentor rather than figuring out from videos and tutorials.

Finally, don't be afraid to ask people about flying their kites. If you can find someone near you who flies ask if you can fly with them sometime. The site has a map, look for active members near you. They likely have some kites that are a little more durable, and people generally enjoy sharing the hobby if you ask nicely.

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Did research for close to a month before I got my 1st kite. Started by looking at the cheaper kites wanting something durable for the grand kids.Watched a video of a guy doing some amazing things in a wheel chair. Became totally inspired for myself. Now I'm hopelessly  hooked.You might be best served by getting a cheap foil since you're not sure how far you want to go . Most of the smaller ones need a 10 mph plus wind to fly in though. A 2.2 will fly lower then the 1.2 for the most part. Learning basic controls on one of those might get you a feel for what draws you to the kites. Get the kite going as fast as you can. Getting as close to the ground as you can without crashing will hone your control pretty quick.Direction you go could be quads, duels and gliders for tricking or precision.Power kiting or the joy of singles floating in the air.Then there's speed kiting. More popular in other countries but intrigues me a lot.Imagine hanging onto a kite 150' out  flying past you center window at 100 mph plus. Gives me shivers of anticipation. Most people on the forums do more than 1 and a lot do it all. Most important to me is feeling the wind. If you like it and start watching a lot of videos you soon realize it's kinda like interpretive dancing. Even the people who put up huge anchored kites have a rhythm  while their tending their kites. I'm a duel flier who wants to trick like a pro. It's harder than the pros make it look. It's the reason I moved up the food chain into the higher end kites pretty fast. I still fly 2 fairly inexpensive 3/4 sized kites a lot. The Premier Nighthawk and Sky Dog Black Dog.I had sold them to get a boutique kite. They're discontinued now and getting harder to find. Missed them a lot. Got lucky and they have been replaced. Tough, fast and very tricky. Both fly lower than there stated wind range for me. The Nighthawk has evolved into the Wolf ng. Don't know which Sky Dog would be the next gen Black Dog if any.  I still have a difficult time in 0 to 1 and 30 plus. In between though I have a blast dancing with the wind.

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On 8/27/2018 at 7:39 PM, coolkev99 said:

[...]
Ok here's the skinny - I don't really see myself getting super-into this hobby (but I'm sure a lot of you thought that) so I don't think I am looking for a kite to "grow into".     I am looking for something relaxing and enjoyable to bring to the beach, yet a little optional fun learning a dual line kite appeals to me.  [...snipped...]

A further thought:

One of the best bang for buck kites we got was an Into The Wind Hata. A single liner. Think they run about 20 US dollars now, and it includes line. It can be flown with its tail on as a standard single liner (which it does quite well, pretty stable in a wide range of winds) -- or as a simple fighter variant. Tail off, it is much less stable but can then be lead about the sky by pointing the kite in the desired direction, pulling in and releasing line when you want to speed up or slow down or stop in that direction and send it off into another. A controllable kite (in a larger sense!).

A little hard to describe but google fighter kites and you’ll get an idea.  Fun learning curve. (We do not use glass covered line however!)

In tail-on mode it is a good gentle flyer for beginners or indeed any flyer. In more advanced mode -- yeee hawww!

Nothing at all wrong with starting with a simple GOOD single liner.

Just a thought for your upcoming week if you are able to grab one in time.

.

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Man o man we forgot to tell Kev to skip all this and immediately order a set of Benson Super Novas. Hang on, hold the phone forget that.That's my day dreams butting in again. MAN O MAN!!

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12 hours ago, coolkev99 said:

Thanks so much everyone!   I'll be back here once I pick something out! 

Choose whatever intrigues you, but leave room for dessert. Don't limit yourself to only having one kite.

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The Prism Quantum offers a better beginner experience than the Nexus, from my experience, but both will fit your requirements.
@


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