cjay

Hq Symphony Pro vs. Prism Synapse. And130 vs 170

Recommended Posts

 

Hq Symphony Pro vs. Prism Synapse.  And1.3 or 140 vs 170

 

I did an uneducated impulse buy on a HQ Symphony Pro 1.3 to try out. I think it looks nice, and it is ok for beginners to mess around with, but I didn't care much for the way it flies. It is twitchy and cant cut a straight line for anything.

Is there much difference between a Prism Synapse and an Hq Symphony Pro in the way they are built?

And is there much difference between the way a 1.3 or 140 and a 170 handle while flying? Especially does a 170 turn slower than a 140 ?

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First a preface that those are all reliable kites from established brands.  They're all good in that regard.

8 hours ago, cjay said:

Is there much difference between a Prism Synapse and an Hq Symphony Pro in the way they are built?  ... It is twitchy and cant cut a straight line for anything.

They're the same class of kites. All of the kites you mentioned are parafoil speed kites. "Para" with its roots the same as parachute, the kites have no spars. "Foil" referring to the airfoil shape, similar to an airplane wing with internal cells.  

There are several sub-classes of parafoil kites. Those are speed kites, the bridle lines on the kite put the kite at an angle to make the kites move quickly, even in relatively light wind.  You are right that these kites feel twitchy, that's because they are speed kites. Among the other sub-classes of parafoils, one popular style is  traction kite or power kites which can have enough pull for buggies or skiing, and another popular style is lift kites or show kites that are large and stable rather than being designed for agility.

The twitchy feeling is part of the style.  All the parafoil speed kites move quickly and are sensitive to input.  They CAN fly in a straight line, but it requires experience and skill.  They are not designed to move slowly like kites designed for slackline tricks, nor move like quad line kites. Fast and nimble are intentional.

8 hours ago, cjay said:

And is there much difference between the way a 1.3 or 140 and a 170 handle while flying? Especially does a 170 turn slower than a 140 ?

Some difference, but they're similar because they're all the same class of kites.

The bigger kites have a bigger sail area and generate more pull.  The 1.3 is 130 cm across, relatively small. It has bigger brothers at 180 cm and 220 cm that can generate more pull. The Synapse family has similar sizes at 140 cm, 170 cm, and 200 cm.   

All of those sizes are still in the speed kite category. Parafoils are not usually considered power kites or traction kites until they reach about 3 meters across.  (Different people use the names differently, commonly power kites are 2 line, traction kites are often four lines, but that isn't universal terminology.)

Turning speed is going to be a matter of several factors. The wind speed, the kite's bridle configuration, and the pilot's body movements will all make a difference.  Bigger kites tend to have more drag (slow down) due to their size, but with some experience a pilot could make a small kite turn slowly and make a large kite turn rapidly.  Even so, they're all parafoil speed kites so they're going to turn fast and fly fast.

8 hours ago, cjay said:

I think it looks nice, and it is ok for beginners to mess around with, but I didn't care much for the way it flies.

The kite is marketed as a beginner kite.  Parafoils are very resilliant kites because they don't have spars (no parts to break) and this one is smaller making it more gentle than it's bigger brothers.  Combined this kite is easier for beginners, but that doesn't mean experienced people can't or won't fly it.

If you like the parafoil style consider keeping the smaller kite in your bag and picking up a larger model.  When winds are strong a large kite can be damaged or be overpowered, the smaller model with less surface area can let you have a similar flying experience.

Whatever you decide to do with it personal preference is important, fly what you enjoy flying.

If you live somewhere near others who fly, such as on a beach or near a kite store, consider asking about flying a variety of kites. Many people have a collection of different kites and will help you experiment a bit to find kites you enjoy.  Flying other people's kites is the cheapest way to go when starting out.  You'll be addicted in no time. ;-)

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wow, one of the most complete answer i ever see. Good job frob.

i will add this, for the parafoil you have you need minimum 4-5 mph wind to fly and you will do that till around 30. with a 2.5-3 kite you will launch in 2-3 mph but because of pull be careful when the wind reach around 10-12. not all the time bigger is better and that depending of you weight and wind speed. at 200 Lbs i have for static fly i never go bigger than 5 on low winds dual or quad 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Flying twitchy and not in straight lines is a result of a combination of these: 

1. The nature of the beast.

2. Wind quality and speed.

3. Pilot's experience level.

4. Size of the kite.

To tame it down use longer lines or fly a bigger kite and fly in smoother wind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One minor note. Classifications for these foils is very specific and the foils you've mentioned are all known as sport foils. Speed foils often fall into this category but not always.. The Sport foils are numbered roughly to denote wingspan.. Traction foils a.k.a. Power Kites are measured in square meters. A 2M Traction foil is significantly larger than and more powerful than a 2.2 Sport foil..

Here is a 2.2 Sport foil (Symphony) on top of a 2M Powerfoil (HQ Crossfire).

 

All that being said, the Sport foils fly pretty much the same all other things being equal. I prefer the Symphony Pro kites by far as the bridling is superior.

 

 

20160804_164018.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all of the replies, much appreciated. I get the picture now.

Sounds like the Symphony Pro was a good choice for these type of kites. I just wasn't sure what size to get. I wanted to get the 1.8 but was concerned about too much pull for smaller people, and in higher winds, so I ended up getting the 1.3.

I don't need to get the 1.8 since it is the same sort of deal and doesn't handle much differently.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now