CaCondor

Full Vent with Time to Think

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Shelter Cove, Ca has grassy, park by, plateaus running along 20 feet above the beach. Good wind and great views.

 So, yesterday I noticed National Weather Service says 10-15 mph, gusts to 20.  OK. I have been looking for wind since the summer doldrums.

  I went with 90' lines and started with JB 1.5 mid vent. Since this was  my first flight, I figured the mid vent would be the one to try. Not so. Too quick for me. Did ok but thank God my son in law was there to turn the kite when I crashed after about 30-60 seconds. I would go to the top of the window and hover thinking about what I would do next. Resting....hiding. Don't want to spin and crash.

   That's when I says " Let's get out the Full Vent." Easy switch to lines. 

  Wind is wild. The mid vent Was pulling me forward and the kite looked liked like an emaciated old man's rib cage in the air.

  I must say that I am so happy I got the full vent in a deal. It turns out that it flew great. It flew slow enough that I could think about what I wanted to do and how I would do that. I was hovering anywhere I put it, take off and landings like a piper cub doing touch and goes. Inverted take offs were easy.   The full vent turns out to be my great beginner discovery for this high wind learning situation.

    This first flight, doing some of the things I learned watching John Barresi videos, was a definite high. Thanks to the Kite Life community for all the help getting to that first flight with some encouragement and knowledge.

  Willie B

 

 

  

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14 hours ago, CaCondor said:

 The mid vent Was pulling me forward and the kite looked liked like an emaciated old man's rib cage in the air.

  

 

 

  

Whoa there Willy. I don't think we've ever met. Comparing me to a kite might be a little forward on your part 😂😁😀. I have a blast on duels in those winds. Got the broken parts to prove it. Without the forums probably would've quit months ago.Glad you came thru unscathed. Get a thong, go to 30mph and PLEASE post videos. The mantra I say to myself a lot is break it, fix it, fly it and repeat as needed. Keeps my nerve up.

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And that is why most quad fliers have several different sails in their bag!! You'll learn which you need for any day. Might even find you have to switch, depending on winds. (like you did) It is always a match up thing.

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Also, that's why the old-timers tell you to be selective with the wind in which you learn to fly. If you must fight the wind for control of the kite you learn nothing except how hard it is to control the kite when the wind is too strong. 

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On 10/8/2018 at 11:23 AM, makatakam said:

you learn nothing except how hard it is to control the kite when the wind is too strong

There are plenty more things you can learn.

For strong winds you learn the cost of spars after they break, how to patch a torn sail, and how to cut down a snapped line into short lines. You also learn the "fire drill" maneuver to rush to the edge of the wind window in heavy gusts, and the importance of stretch strips sewn into the kite fabric to slow down the eventual wear.

For light/variable winds you can learn patience, learn how to read the tells of an incoming wind by watching the distance, and get the exercise of the "walk of shame" out to the kite as it repeatedly falls (or learn about "magic sticks").

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30 minutes ago, frob said:

There are plenty more things you can learn.

For strong winds you learn the cost of spars after they break, how to patch a torn sail, and how to cut down a snapped line into short lines. You also learn the "fire drill" maneuver to rush to the edge of the wind window in heavy gusts, and the importance of stretch strips sewn into the kite fabric to slow down the eventual wear.

For light/variable winds you can learn patience, learn how to read the tells of an incoming wind by watching the distance, and get the exercise of the "walk of shame" out to the kite as it repeatedly falls (or learn about "magic sticks").

Yup! That's right!

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9 hours ago, frob said:

There are plenty more things you can learn.

For strong winds you learn the cost of spars after they break, how to patch a torn sail, and how to cut down a snapped line into short lines. You also learn the "fire drill" maneuver to rush to the edge of the wind window in heavy gusts, and the importance of stretch strips sewn into the kite fabric to slow down the eventual wear.

For light/variable winds you can learn patience, learn how to read the tells of an incoming wind by watching the distance, and get the exercise of the "walk of shame" out to the kite as it repeatedly falls (or learn about "magic sticks").

I have to take the wind I get if I want to fly.  But, right now, the best thing I have going for my quad flying evolution is my wife and son in law who windmill my sail for me when I go down.  It's all fun, even messing with the twisted lines.

52022674-BECC-4698-B07B-8806297FA85A.jpeg

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14 hours ago, CaCondor said:

  It's all fun, even messing with the twisted lines.

 

After reading that statement I'd say you're forever hooked LOL. 

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  It's all fun, even messing with the twisted lines.

 

If you watch JB's tutorial on line management - you should never have really twisted lines again. Maybe a few small twists here or there, but nothing major. Watch that tutorial til your sick of it - then watch it some more! Once you develop that system and get it successfully - NEVER DEVIATE! Do it the same way over and over - a habit!! Never let someone else wind your lines - if they are a mess, it's all on you that way! 

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