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KAP Jasa

Giant Wiener Doggo Kite - first flight

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Hi all!

Here is the footage of the first flight of our newest monster, a Giant Wiener Doggo Kite, designed and made by dr.agon.
 

 

The kite itself (with Caly the KAP dog appliqué) is 6 m by 1,5 m ripstop nylon, and the tail is 15 m by 3,6 m taft.

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